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Rapper XXXTentacion shot, killed in South Florida

Rapper XXXTentacion was shot and later died in Deerfield Beach, Florida, Monday.

TMZ first reported the 20-year-old, whose real name is Jahseh Onfroy, was unresponsive and, according to a witness, did not appear to have a pulse. The celebrity gossip site reported that died shortly after, according to the Broward Sheriff's Office. He was pronounced dead at 5:40 p.m.

According to People, the shooting was reported at 3:57 p.m.

“There was a shooting in Deerfield. Our officers are on the scene and we’re gathering information,” Broward County Sheriff's Office spokesman Jonathan Fishman told Miami New Times earlier Monday afternoon. “We can't confirm anything else right now but will release more information soon.”

TMZ reported that the Broward County Fire Department said Onfroy was rushed to a hospital. A graphic, censored video on the gossip site shows the scene of the shooting.

>> Read more trending news 

Dispatch audio obtained by TMZ indicates the shooting was reported as a drive by. Onfroy was at a motorcycle dealership when the shooting occurred.

Onfroy recently appeared on XXL Mag’s Freshman Class issue. Winning the fan vote to appear on the cover, he posed with amaiyah, A Boogie Wit Da Hoodie, PnB Rock, MadeinTYO, Playboi Carti, Aminé, Kap G, KYLE and Ugly God. His second album “?” debuted at No. 1 on the Billboard 200.

Outside of music, Onfroy is awaiting trial, accused of domestic violence against his pregnant girlfriend. According to an October 2016 arrest report, Onfroy was charged with battery and aggravated assault of a pregnant victim and false imprisonment. He pleaded no contest to charges of armed home invasion robbery and aggravated battery with a firearm and was released from jail on bail March 26, 2017. He was ordered to serve six years of probation. He was accused by prosecutors of witness tampering and was jailed again in December 2017 before being released on house arrest. 

In March of this year, Onfroy was released from house arrest so he could go on tour.

Before Trump policy, immigrant families arrested at border were detained together

Before the Trump administration started separating parents and children caught illegally crossing the border, immigrant families were held together in two facilities in South Texas

>> Read more trending news

Human rights activists were outraged by the Obama administration’s decision to lock up the families, calling the practice inhumane and psychologically harmful. Immigrant watchdogs, meanwhile, argued that the family detention centers helped deter illegal immigration and protect national security.

At the South Texas Family Residential Center in Dilley, Texas, women and children lived 12 to a building, complete with bunk beds. From their barracks, they could walk a short distance to a library, chapel and medical and dental clinics. There was also a “city park” with a soccer field, volleyball court and playground. Children attended school for four hours a day.

Erika Cisneros is one of the more than 100 attorneys, paralegals and other volunteers who recently streamed into South Texas to help the immigrant families. She objects to separating the children from their parents, and said she is particularly worried about the long-term psychological impact on the boys and girls. 

“You have innocent young children who didn’t choose, didn’t make that decision to come with their parents. Their parents brought them,” said Cisneros, an immigration attorney based in Moultrie, Georgia. “These kids are being traumatized.”

>> Related: How to help immigrant children separated from families

President Donald Trump addressed the issue Monday at the White House during a meeting with the National Space Council, emphasizing border security and repeating his call for a merit-based legal immigration system.

“The United States will not be a migrant camp and it will not be a refugee holding facility,” he said. “It won't be. If you look at what's happening in Europe, if you look at what's happening in other places, we can't allow that to happen to the United States, not on my watch.”

In 2015, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution visited that facility in Dilley and another one in Karnes City, Texas, and interviewed some of the detainees and the pro bono attorneys from Georgia who were helping them. 

Woman found dead in freezer following husband’s suicide, police say

Arkansas police officers attempting to notify a woman of her husband’s suicide earlier this month found her body stuffed into a freezer at their home. 

Lori Jean Bruick, 55, of West Fork, died of blunt force trauma, according to a news release from the West Fork Police Department. Her obituary puts the day she died as June 7.

West Fork police officers learned of Lawrence “Larry” Bruick’s apparent suicide June 10 from Logan County sheriff’s deputies, who reported that the 56-year-old took his life about 100 miles away from home near Mount Magazine, police officials said. Officers began trying to contact Lori Bruick at the couple’s home that day to deliver the news.

The officers were unable to make contact with Lori Bruick the following day, either. 

“Officers could see items in the home that led them to believe that Mrs. Bruick was still at home,” the West Fork police’s news release said

The officers forced entry into the home, at which time they found men’s clothing that appeared to have blood on them, the news release said. They also found letters that indicated Larry Bruick was contemplating suicide. 

Evidence of a struggle was found in the couple’s garage, the news release said. Lori Bruick’s body was found in a chest freezer inside the garage, officials said. 

Police officials said investigators do not know what caused the fight that precipitated the slaying. Larry Bruick, whose obituary indicated that he died the day before he was found, was the sole suspect in the homicide, officials said. 

>> Read more trending news

The couple is survived by two grown children, four grandchildren and a host of other relatives, according to Lori Bruick’s obituary. A joint funeral was held Monday morning, and Lori Bruick is scheduled to be buried Tuesday in her native Texarkana. 

It was not clear if Larry Bruick would be buried alongside her. 

A statement said to be from the family was posted on the Arkansas High School Class of ’81 alumni Facebook page

“The Bruick family has suffered a tragedy and that resulted in loss of life for Larry and Lori Bruick. Many details remain unclear and likely will for some time,” the statement said. “We thank you for and covet your prayers, messages of support, and actions of kindness. As we move forward, we ask that you respect the family's privacy concerning the details of this tragedy as we move through the grieving process.”

One former classmate called the pair a “match made in heaven.”

“Now they get to dance with angels,” Chuck Phillips wrote. “Prayers for the family.”

A memorial video on the funeral home’s website shows photos of the couple with their family in happier times. In lieu of flowers, the family asked for donations in Lori Bruick’s name to the Washington Regional Medical Center’s patient benevolence fund. 

According to a LinkedIn profile in her name, Lori Bruick was a respiratory therapist there. 

The family asked for donations in Larry Bruick’s name to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention

Trump orders new Space Force: ‘We must have dominance in space’

President Donald Trump announced the formation of the Space Force, a new branch of the military, during a meeting Monday of his National Space Council at the White House.

>> Read more trending news 

Trump said getting ahead in space is integral to the nation’s national security.

“When it comes to defending America, it is not enough to merely have an American presence in space, we must have American dominance in space,” Trump said during a speech at the meeting. 

“I’m hereby directing the Department of Defense and Pentagon to immediately begin the process necessary to establish a Space Force as the sixth branch of the armed forces. That’s a big statement. We are going to have the Air Force and we are going to have the Space Force. Separate, but equal. It is going to be something. So important,” he said.

Trump has previously mentioned his intention to create a Space Force. 

The president also signed an initiative called “Space Policy Directive -3, National Space Traffic Management Policy.” Among other issues, the document addresses the unfolding crisis and growing danger of space junk circling the planet.

National Space Council executive secretary Scott Pace said the policy addresses “the challenges of a congested space environment,” CNN reported.

>> Related: Trump signs directive to send Americans back to the moon, eventually Mars

“If we’re going to expand the economy in space, we need to make sure it’s done in a sustainable way,” Pace said.

The policy will also help private space interests in “more rapid and more accurate information on where they can launch” as well as “flexibility in launch windows,” Pace said, according to CNN

 

Trump's 'zero tolerance' immigration policy: 4 things to know

The national debate over immigration has ramped up in recent weeks after reports surfaced that authorities on the U.S.-Mexico border are separating migrant children from their parents as part of the Trump administration’s efforts to deal with people who come into the country illegally.

>> Read more trending news

This spring, the Trump administration ordered prosecutors to charge every person illegally crossing the border. Children traveling with the adults have been separated and placed in detention centers.

>> Is the immigration separation policy new, where did it come from, where are the detention centers? 

Here are some things to know about the immigration policy:

1. The ‘zero tolerance’ immigration policy was announced in April.

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced in April that he had directed prosecutors along the southwest border “to have a zero tolerance policy toward immigration.”

>> Immigration: Trump administration defends 'zero tolerance' policy

“Our goal is to prosecute every case that is brought to us,” Sessions said in April. “There must be consequences for illegal actions, and I am confident in the ability of our federal prosecutors to carry out this new mission.”

2. Nearly 2,000 children were separated from families after the policy announcement.

In the six weeks after Sessions’ announcement, nearly 2,000 children have been separated from their families, a spokesman for the U.S. Department of Homeland Security told reporters Friday.

>> Laura Bush, Melania Trump speak out on separation of immigrant children, parents at border 

From April 19 to May 31, officials said, 1,995 minors were separated from 1,940 adults who said they were the guardians of the children, CNN reported.

3. Trump claims the separations are the Democrats’ fault.

“It is the Democrats fault for being weak and ineffective with Boarder Security and Crime,” Trump wrote Monday in a tweet. “Tell them to start thinking about the people devastated by Crime coming from illegal immigration. Change the laws!”

4. No law mandates the separation of migrant children from parents.

Despite the president’s insistence that Democrats are to blame for the recent rash of separations, fact checkers with PolitifactSnopes and other organizations agree that the surge is not due to a law, but is due to Trump’s order.

>> Trump border policy: How to help immigrant children separated from families

Department of Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen said Sunday in a tweet, “We do not have a policy of separating families at the border. Period.”

Officials with DHS clarified in a news release Monday, saying that while the department has no “blanket policy of separating families at the border,” it will do as much “under certain circumstances.”

Officials said the circumstances include “when the parent or legal guardian is referred for criminal prosecution,” as many would be if accused of entering the country illegally.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Ex-NBA player JJ Hickson stole $100,000, assaulted teen during home invasion, officials say

A former NBA player stole $100,000 during a violent home invasion and left a 17-year-old resident with multiple broken bones, authorities said Monday.

Records show James Edward “JJ” Hickson Jr., 29, is in the Coweta County Jail without bond on charges of armed robbery with a knife in connection with the incident, which occurred Friday night at a home in Senoia, Georgia.

>> Read more trending news 

According to a Coweta County Sheriff’s Office report obtained by WSB, Hickson entered the home through a side door and attacked the teen. His face and head were covered, officials said in the report.

The teen received medical treatment and is expected to be OK, officials said.

Related: Former NBA player JJ Hickson charged with armed robbery in home invasion

At least two people were involved in the home invasion, but only Hickson faces charges, Coweta County Sheriff's Department spokesman Jimmy Yarbrough said. 

Another department took Hickson into custody, and he was turned over to Coweta County afterward.

Hickson was a standout basketball player at Joseph Wheeler High School in Marietta, Georgia, and attended North Carolina State University before being drafted by the Cleveland Cavaliers with the 19th pick in the 2008 NBA draft.

He went on to play for the Cavaliers, Sacramento Kings, Portland Trail Blazers, Denver Nuggets and Washington Wizards over the course of his eight-year NBA career. He most recently played basketball overseas for the Lebanon Champville SC team in 2018.

Police: Texas deputy repeatedly sexually assaulted 4-year-old, threatened mother with deportation

A Bexar County Sheriff's Department deputy was arrested on a felony charge of super aggravated sexual assault Sunday after a 4-year-old girl’s mother was blackmailed to stay silent about the abuse, according to police. The victim’s mother is an undocumented immigrant and was threatened with deportation if she spoke out.

>> Read more trending news 

KENS reported that department officials arrested detention Deputy Jose Nunez, 47, after the victim told her mother about the abuse Saturday night in San Antonio, Texas.

Sheriff Javier Salazar said at a news conference Sunday that the mother went to a local fire station and Nunez was arrested. 

"The details of the case are quite frankly heartbreaking, disturbing, disgusting and infuriating all at the same time," Salazar said, adding that Nunez had physical contact with the victim and there was "at least some indication of minor injury."

"We have reason to believe that this goes back at least several months, possibly a couple of  several years," Salazar said.

Nunez, a 10-year veteran of the department, is on administrative leave pending an investigation.

Former ‘Jeopardy!’ champ pleads guilty to sneaking into college email accounts

A former assistant professor at a Michigan college who won seven episodes of “Jeopardy!” in 2012 pleaded guilty to sneaking into the email accounts of other professors, students and administrators, The Daily Telegram reported.

>> Read more trending news 

Stephanie Jass, 48, who taught history at Adrian College, pleaded guilty Wednesday to a charge of unauthorized computer access. She faces up to five years in prison and is expected to be sentenced July 20, the newspaper reported.

At the time she was a contestant on “Jeopardy!,” Jass’ seven victories were tied for the best winning streak on the popular game show. That record has since been broken, the Telegram reported.

Police said that during a four-day period in the spring of 2017, Jass logged into other people’s email accounts without permission after the college reset passwords and gave teachers, students and administrators the same temporary passwords, the Telegram reported. Another professor discovered that Jass was accessing other accounts and reported it to school officials, the newspaper reported.

Jass admitted accessing the emails of school administrators, faculty members, students and even her stepson to school officials in May 2017, The Jackson Citizen Patriot reported.

Jass was "terminated with cause" in January, the Citizen Patriot reported.

Officer’s tweet after pulling over slow driver in left lane goes viral

An Indiana State Police officer is getting attention from the internet after pulling over a driver for going too slow in the left lane and backing up traffic.

>> Read more trending news

Sgt. Stephen Wheeles posted about the traffic stop Saturday on Twitter.

"I stopped this vehicle today for a left lane violation on I-65. The driver had approximately 20 cars slowed behind her because she would not move back to the right lane," Wheeles tweeted. "Again...if there are vehicles behind you, you must move to the right lane to allow them to pass."

By Monday, the post had been retweeted more than 20,000 times and had 60,000 likes. Wheeles even engaged some commenters, offering an extended driver’s education lesson when asked if the rule applied to drivers going the speed limit in the left lane.

“The spirit of the law is that since many people drive well above the speed limit, it creates an ‘accordion effect’ as traffic starts backing up behind the slower vehicle,” Wheeles said. “This is where many of our crashes occur on the interstates. It’s all in the name of safety.”

Apple to offer 911 location feature in iOS12 update

An operating system update is bringing a new feature to iPhones. iOS12 will allow 911 to pinpoint callers’ locations starting later this year.

Apple made the announcement Monday.

The company is using RapidSOS to share HELO location data with 911 centers. It promises that the information will not be used for non-emergency purposes and that the 911 centers will only have the information during the call. 

The upgrade will help when callers don’t know exactly where they are or can’t verbally tell 911 operators the location, CNN reported.

Currently, 911 centers use cell tower information from carriers. That gives emergency responders a large area to investigate, CNN reported.

RapidSOS recently partnered with Uber, which added a 911 call button inside its app.

When the app goes online, it will be set on by default, but there will be an opt-out in settings, CNN reported.

Is the immigration separation policy new, where did it come from, where are the detention centers?

Amid calls for the end of a policy that has separated upward of 2,000 migrant children from their parents along the southern border of the United States since April, President Donald Trump said Monday that “the United States will not be a migrant camp and it will not be a refugee-holding facility… not on my watch.”

The growing outcry has included Republican and Democratic voices, as well as a former and the current first lady. 

Former first lady Laura Bush called the practice “cruel” and “immoral.” First lady Melania Trump issued a statement saying she “hates” to see families separated at the border, and hopes both Democrats and Republicans can come together to reform the nation’s immigration laws.

What has caused the most recent uproar? Here is what you need to know about the government’s “zero tolerance” policy and its practice.

What is the policy?

In April, the Justice Department notified all U.S. attorney’s offices along the Southwest border of a “zero-tolerance policy” when it comes to violation of immigration laws. The notification addressed both “attempted illegal entry and illegal entry into the United States by an alien." 

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions said the government was committing to criminal immigration enforcement instead of seeing the crimes as a violation of civil law. He directed federal prosecutors to prioritize the prosecution of certain criminal immigration offenses. 

The practice had been that when parents arriving illegally with their children were caught, they were quickly released with orders to appear later in court on a civil charge of entering the country illegally.

The Southwest border mentioned in the notification includes the districts of Arizona, New Mexico, the Western and Southern Districts of Texas and the Southern District of California.

Is this a new policy?

No, it is not a new policy. The “zero-tolerance” policy is related to another policy called Operation Streamline. Operation Streamline was an initiative by the Department of Homeland Security and the Department of Justice that was initiated in 2005. Under Operation Streamline those caught in the act of crossing the U.S. border without authorization may be rounded up and subject to criminal prosecution. Prior to implementing Operation Streamline, most prosecutors brought civil charges for illegal entry into the U.S.

Penalties under Operation Streamline were:

First-time offenders are prosecuted for misdemeanor illegal entry (8 U.S.C. Section 1325) which carries a six-month maximum sentence.

Any migrant who has been deported in the past and attempts to re-enter without authorization can be charged with felony re-entry, which carries a two-year sentence. It could involve more time, up to 20 years, if the migrant has a criminal record.

Why the policy change in April?

According to the notification, the zero tolerance policy “comes as the Department of Homeland Security reported a 203 percent increase in illegal border crossings from March 2017 to March 2018, and a 37 percent increase from February 2018 to March 2018 — the largest month-to-month increase since 2011.”

Why are children being taken from their parents? 

Children are being separated from their parents because their parents are being arrested and put into federal criminal custody. Children cannot be housed in prisons, so they are being taken to centers to be cared for if relatives in the United States cannot be located to care for them. 

What happens to them and where are they being held?

When a child is separated from their parent after entering the country illegally, he or she is classified as an unaccompanied alien child – meaning a minor who is not in the company of a parent or guardian and is not in the country legally.

Unaccompanied alien children are put into the custody of the Department of Health and Human Services. The Office of Refugee Resettlement, an umbrella organization of the HHS, is responsible for the care of these children. ORR contracts with child care providers to take care of the children. 

According to The New York Times, ORR is now overseeing an estimated 100 shelters in 17 states. The Corpus Christi Caller has reported that Southwest Key Programs “operates 16 of the 35 shelters that contract with the ORR” in Texas. It was one of those shelters where U.S. Sen. Jeff Merkley, (D-Oregon),  was denied entrance last week.

How many children are we talking about?

The number varies, but nearly 2,000 children were separated from their parents in April and May – after the zero-tolerance policy was put into effect.

 

 

Trump border policy: How to help immigrant children separated from families

An immigration policy implemented by the administration of President Donald Trump in May has led to an significant increase in migrant children being separated from their families.

The “no tolerance policy” attempts to crack down on illegal boarder crossings and allows border security agents in the Southwest to separate children of immigrants trying to enter the U.S. illegally, according to CBS News.

>> Read more trending news 

The Associated Press reported that, according to government statistics, the police has separated nearly 2,000 children from their families, placing them in detention centers and shelters.

Protest

Organizations like National Domestic Workers Alliance and Families Belong Together have hosted events across the country to raise awareness and call for aid to families who have been separated.

Contact elected representatives

Advocates on this issue can find out who represents your state and contact them to express disapproval of the separation of immigrant children from their parents at the border. A sample script is at the American Civil Liberties Union website. and says, “Hi, my name is (your name) and my zip code is (your zip code). I’m urging the Senator to denounce Trump’s family separation policy and use all of Congress' authority to stop it.”Find the contact information for Congress at Senate.gov and House.gov.

Write to media outlets

Vicki Gaubeca, the director of Southern Border Communities Coalition, told The Cut that writing op-ed pieces and letters to the editor at media outlets can raise awareness. 

“If you think about what the Republican Party has stood for, it’s family values and protecting children, so it seems contradictory that they’re engaging in this enforcement activity of ripping kids from their families,” she said. “It’s really troubling to see that an administration can be so callous. It’s beyond the pale.”

Sign petitions

Organizations like the ACLU and National Domestic Workers Alliance have petitions on their websites that call on the Trump administration to stop separating immigrant children from their families. 

Volunteer and donate

According to the website of U.S. Rep. Tony Cárdenas, D-Calif., the detention centers and shelters holding the unaccompanied children do not allow volunteers, but services can be provided in the form of pro bono legal services, as a foster care parent and in monetary donations.

Some organizations that take donations and volunteers in support of the children are below.

Police: 13-year-old girl dead in ‘brutal’ killing, grandmother’s body also believed found

Police in Alabama have charged two men with the slaying of a 13-year-old girl and anticipate charges in the death of the girl’s grandmother, whose remains may have been found Friday near a rural cemetery. 

Yoni Martinez Aguilar, 26, and Israel Gonzalez Palomino, 34, have been charged with capital murder in the death of Mariah Feit Lopez. WAFF in Huntsville reported that the teen and her grandmother, Oralia Mendoza, had been missing from the city since the weekend of June 2.

Mendoza was reported missing June 6 by worried relatives, the news station reported. 

Lopez, whose body was found the following day in a wooded area in nearby Owens Cross Roads, was identified last week through dental records, Madison County Sheriff’s Office officials said in a news release

Sheriff’s Office spokesman Lt. Donny Shaw described Lopez’s cause of death as “heinous” but declined to say how she was killed, WAFF reported

“It’s a very brutal means of death and whenever the public learns of it, it’s going to be shocking and it’s going to be upsetting a lot of people,” Shaw told the news station. “We want to deliver that information so that we don’t harm the upcoming cases and trials that will be had.”

Investigators believe that the teen was killed where her body was found.

Bethel Lemley, the owner of the property where Lopez was found, said her son-in-law spotted the girl’s body in some weeds near her driveway.

“My daughter said, ‘Mama, you can see her foot and see her leg,’” Lemley told WAFF. “I couldn’t see it, but they did.”

The homeowner said she could not understand who would commit such a crime. 

“Who could have done such a cruel thing?” Lemley said. “Kill somebody and throw them off like a dog; like an animal.”

The homicide case began as a death investigation when Lopez’s body was found. At that time, detectives were asking the public for help identifying the person found. 

The teen was described as wearing red pajama pants with gingerbread men on them, as well as a pink undershirt and black tank top. A news release indicated that she also had a cerebral shunt. 

>> Read more trending news

Gina Long, a substitute teacher who taught Lopez at Challenger Middle School, in Huntsville, described the girl as quiet and sweet in an interview with WAFF

“She got along well with everyone in the class,” Long said. “Everyone liked her.” 

She said her heart broke when she learned that the 13-year-old was the victim found dead in the county earlier this month. 

“She didn’t deserve anything that could have happened,” Long said

A Huntsville City Schools spokesman told WAFF that school administrators and officials were saddened to learn of Lopez’s death.

“We extend our heartfelt sympathy to the family and will keep them in our thoughts and prayers,” Keith Ward said

The case was first described as a homicide investigation a week after the discovery of the body, when the honor roll student was positively identified. Mendoza, who was Lopez’s legal guardian, was still missing and believed to be in danger, Sheriff’s Office officials said.

The case moved quickly at that point, with Aguilar and Palomino being developed as suspects overnight. Both men, who were acquaintances of Mendoza and her granddaughter, were subsequently taken into custody at the home they shared.

Palomino was initially arrested for possession of methamphetamine, WAFF reported. Both men were interviewed separately, at which time detectives developed enough probable cause to arrest them in Lopez’s killing. 

Leads in the investigation led detectives to Moon Cemetery, where the second body was found, according to a news release issued Friday. The cemetery is about 2½ miles from the wooded area where Lopez’s body was found. 

“There is reason to believe that the remains are those of Oralia Mendoza, the missing guardian/grandmother of Mariah Lopez,” the release said. “However, positive identification will have to be made by the Department of Forensic Sciences.”

The news release did not indicate if either of the men led investigators to the body’s location. 

Shaw told WAFF that all indications were that the body was that of Mendoza.

“It’s a sad update, but it’s moving closer as to when we can make a positive identification (and) we can give this family some closure as to what happened, how it happened and what exactly occurred in this case,” Shaw said

The spokesman credited the community with moving the investigation forward.

“For a murder where there were no indications, no witnesses, nothing to lean on when we began with it, the Hispanic community, the partners, the media, we’ve been able to do a phenomenal thing in just a little over seven days by coming to the arrests of two individuals,” Shaw said

Palomino and Aguilar are both being held without bond in the Madison County jail. Aguilar is also being held for U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. 

Police look for couple who ignored injured woman

New Castle police are asking for help in finding a couple who did nothing to help a seriously injured woman at Fort Constitution.

>> Read more trending news

Security footage shows the couple, a middle-aged white man and a middle-aged Asian or Hispanic woman, were aware of the injury as they walked past the woman June 10 and left in a white convertible, according to Seacoast Online

New Castle police, fire and rescue and the U.S. Coast Guard responded to the scene and helped the woman, who was injured by falling debris.

Indiana woman who passed out in White Castle drive-thru arrested on DUI charge

An Indiana woman who police found unresponsive in the drive-thru of a White Castle on Saturday was arrested on a DUI charge, WXIN reported.

>> Read more trending news 

Police officers responded when they received a call at 4:50 a.m. about a woman asleep in the driver’s seat as her car was in the drive-thru lane, according to the television station.

Joanna M. Purtlebaugh, 30, was roused by officers, who administered several field sobriety tests that she failed, WXIN reported.

Purtlebaugh’s results on a portable breath test were nearly twice the legal limit in Indiana, the television station reported. She was taken to a hospital for a blood test and was booked into the Bartholomew County Jail.

Purtlebaugh is facing a charge of operating a vehicle while intoxicated, WXIN reported.

Florida man chugs beer during DUI stop, deputies say

A Florida man did not hide his thirst Thursday. When he eventually pulled over for deputies, he chugged a beer, investigators said. 

>> Read more trending news

Daryl Royal Riedel told Monroe County Sheriff’s Office investigators that, when he was scared when he was stopped and Deputy Anthony Lopez started to approach him, he was scared, so he drove off. Riedel, 48, has a suspended license, and had three previous DUI convictions with a fourth pending. 

Lopez pursued Riedel, who pulled over after a brief chase. Riedel got out of his pickup truck holding a beer, which he then proceeded to chug. 

Riedel was arrested and charged with felony DUI, fleeing and eluding, reckless driving, driving with a suspended license and failure to submit a breath test. 

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Actress Heather Locklear hospitalized for psychiatric evaluation, police say

Actress Heather Locklear was hospitalized Sunday in Thousand Oaks, California, for a psychiatric evaluation, the Ventura County Sheriff’s Office confirmed to Us magazine.

>> Read more trending news 

Locklear, 56, who starred on “Melrose Place” and “Dynasty,” was acting erratically and threatened to hurt herself, a police source told Us. The source told Us that a family member called 911.

According to TMZ, the Ventura County Sheriff’s Office and the Ventura County Fire Department responded to the 911 call and went to Locklear’s home.

According to a 911 audio dispatch call obtained by TMZ, the family member called 911 and said Locklear was looking for a gun to shoot herself.

>> Heather Locklear arrested on suspicion of domestic violence

Police told Us that there was no crime committed at Locklear’s home, “only a medical issue.”

Locklear was arrested Feb. 26 on a felony charge of domestic violence and three counts of misdemeanor battery on a police officer after a dispute with her boyfriend, Chris Heisser.

World Health Organization declares gaming disorder official condition, publishes diagnosis criteria

Parents may think their children are addicted to video games. now The World Health Organization has declared it a new mental health condition. 

Specifically, the WHO has listed gaming disorder as a condition in the 11th edition of the International Classification of Diseases, CNN reported.

The WHO announcedlast year that it was going to include the disorder in the latest edition.

Dr. Vladimir Poznyak said the group is not setting a precedent, but instead followed “the trends, the developments, which have taken place in populations and the professional field.”

>> Read more trending news 

Poznyak is a member of the WHO’s Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse, the group that proposed the diagnosis to the World Health Assembly.

According to the WHO, the disorder “affects only a small proportion of people who engage in digital- or video-gaming activities.” But it also warns people to be aware of how much time they spend gaming, especially at the cost of other activities. They also want gamers to be aware of changes to their physical or psychological health and social functioning.

Being diagnosed with a gaming addiction is not new. The United Kingdom actually has private clinics that treat it, the BBC reported.

>>Read: Family seeks treatment for 9-year-old ‘addicted’ to playing ‘Fortnite’

There are also clinics in the United States, such as reSTART, CNN reported

Hilarie Cash is the co-founder of reSTART, said she is surprised that it has taken as long as it has to include gaming disorder in the ICD.

“I’ve been surprised it’s taken so long for everybody to catch up to the fact. But I also understand that they need to have strong, researched-based evidence before they bring on a new disorder,” Cash told CNN.

But not all agree that an official diagnosis is needed. 

>>Read: Gaming disorder officially recognized as mental health issue

Anthony Bean, a licensed psychologist, said it is early to officially name the condition.

“It’s a little bit premature to label this as a diagnosis,” Bean told CNN. “I’m a clinician and a researcher, so I see people who play video games and believe themselves to be on the lines of addicted.” 

Bean said games are a coping mechanism for anxiety or depression and that the criteria used to determine gaming disorder are too broad and subjective.

Puerto Rico still needs help: List of volunteer opportunities, charities

Hurricane Maria, the Category 4 storm that devastated Puerto Rico in September 2017, is estimated to have resulted in up to 5,000 fatalities in its aftermath.

Maria caused the longest blackout in U.S. history, leaving the entire island of 3.3 million people, including those in hospitals and nursing homes who relied on respirators, without power. 

>> Read more trending news 

"Indirect deaths resulting from worsening of chronic conditions or from delayed medical treatments may not be captured on death certificates," Harvard University researchers said in a May 2018 study, which contended that the official government death toll of 64 is a "substantial underestimate."

Related: Study: Puerto Rico death toll 4,600 higher post-Maria

According to the study, this makes Hurricane Maria more than twice as deadly as Hurricane Katrina. 

Following the Harvard report, more than 400 pairs of empty shoes were placed outside the capital building in San Juan, part of a growing memorial to the hundreds of people presumed dead during or in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria. 

Puerto Rico Gov. Ricardo Rossello told CNN there would be “hell to pay” if officials do not release the updated death toll.

Related: Puerto Rico’s empty shoes: Public demands transparency in Hurricane Maria death toll

The Category 5 storm hit the U.S. Virgin Islands in mid-September and eventually downgraded to a Category 4, but not before it plowed through Puerto Rico on Sept. 20, 2017, flooded the streets, collapsed homes and left the entire territory without power.

Though it’s been several months since the disaster, the U.S. territory could still use your help. Here are some ways to give assistance to Puerto Rico.

Related: Volunteer trip to Puerto Rico reveals an island still recovering from Hurricane Maria

Support Puerto Rico tourism

Tourism makes up 10 percent of Puerto Rico’s gross domestic product. While many resorts and attractions are still struggling to reopen their doors to tourists, about 80 percent of Puerto Rico’s hotels and restaurants officially began serving customers again in April. Many resorts, including the Dorado Beach Resort, which is a Ritz-Carlton Reserve, and the St. Regis Bahia Beach Resort are set to open in October.

"Tourism dollars means that more than 50,000 people will keep their jobs and businesses will keep running," New York Magazine reported.

Airbnb announced in May that, for the next three months, it will be donating any fees from booked trips to recovery organizations, such as All Hands Volunteers.

And while you’re in Puerto Rico, be sure to visit the farmers markets, which have suffered from buyer loss due to post-hurricane island flight.

Related: Hurricane season is officially here. How much damage will 2018 bring?

Your Puerto Rican adventures can do some good, too.

"Rappelling down San Cristobal Canyon supports conservation efforts in the area, a snorkeling trip to a coral reef or mangrove forest might include collecting data on local flora and fauna, and nighttime kayaking to the bioluminescent Mosquito Bay helps fund initiatives to reduce light pollution," Travel and Leisure reported, adding that most tours are under $15 and can be booked online.

You can also plant trees while in the area by signing up with Para La Naturaleza in Cabo Rojo or Barranquitas, or help clean up the coast and help the ecosystems in Manatí.

Related: FEMA tells Southeast to prepare for 2018 hurricane season

The official Islands of Puerto Rico website says, "Thank you in advance for your interest in visiting Puerto Rico and supporting our recovery by simply vacationing on the island."

Donate money

You can donate funds to a variety of nonprofits and aid organizations working to help Puerto Rico recover. Here are some reputable sites to consider giving monetary donations to:

  • Google.org: Google has committed to matching up to $2 million in donations made between June 8-20 in this campaign heralded by Lin-Manuel Miranda. Your full donation goes directly to one of the charities listed on the official website. Many on the list are also mentioned below.
  • Save the Children: Emergency relief and help for children directly affected by the hurricane.
  • Mercy Corps: Long-term local solutions.
  • Heart to Heart International: Medical care.
  • Hispanic Federation: Provides grants to support more than 70 aid/recovery nonprofits in Puerto Rico.
  • Project HOPE: Medical care.
  • Water Mission: Safe and clean water system restoration.
  • Direct Relief: Health care safety net.
  • First Book: Books and educational resources for children affected.
  • Global Giving: Emergency supplies plus long-term recovery assistance.
  • Habitat for Humanity: Rebuilding and repair.
  • Mission 500: Security company working to serve communities in crisis; holding service trip in the fall.
  • UNICEF: Emergency relief and help for children affected.
  • Amigos de Los Animales: Animal rescue.
  • All Hands: Structural recovery.

Charity Navigator can be used to learn more about the organizations before donating. Note that sending money via text message may seem convenient, but according to The Associated Press, that’s not the case. Charities often have to wait on phone companies to release the money.

Related: How dangerous is a hurricane? Understanding hurricane categories

Volunteer

  • Connect Relief: Food distribution and home reconstruction.
  • Join Mission 500: Security industry professionals interested in assisting families during a service trip from Oct. 31 to Nov. 4.
  • All Hands: Gutting, mucking, debris removal, mold sanitations, cement roofing via computer-generated imagery. Two-week volunteer commitments in Barranquitas and Yabucoa available.
  • Para La Naturaleza: Cleaning and taking care of ecological gardens; helping endangered species.
  • Visit Rico: Farming, agriculture experts .
  • Amigos de los Animales: Help local animal shelters find homes for abandoned cats and dogs. Volunteers can also help clean shelters and photograph animals for the organization’s website.
  • Instituto Nueva Escuela: Help paint schools, repair playgrounds and mentor children affected by school closings and budget cuts post-Maria.
  • Americas for Conservation and the Arts: Social media experts, digital and web-proficient workers to help with volunteer coordination.
  • Chef José Andrés’s World Central Kitchen: Help cook and package fresh meals from one of the #ChefsForPuertoRico kitchens to deliver to the territory’s recovering communities.
  • Explora PR: Adventure travel company with internship and volunteer opportunities geared toward outreach, summer camps, camps for children with autism spectrum disorder and more.
  • Vamonos: Student-focused tour operator with volunteer opportunities related to service in orphanages, foster homes, soup kitchens, construction, environment, schools and more.
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