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Orlando Melbourne International Airport reopens after security breach; man arrested

Florida’s Orlando Melbourne International Airport has reopened after an early morning security breach Thursday morning, and a 22-year-old college student is now in police custody, authorities said.

Here are the latest updates:

Update 1:25 p.m. EDT Sept. 20: Airport officials said the suspect was a 22-year-old part-time college student from Trinidad and Tobago who had a pilot’s license. Authorities had earlier said the suspect was 26.

The man parked his car outside the terminal and left it running, police said. He then ran through the grass and jumped the barbed-wired fence to gain access, officials said.

"This is a first for me. I fly out of here two to three times a year. This is an odd incident," traveler Lenny Rife said.

An airport employee saw the man enter the Airbus 321, and called airport police, who then called the Melbourne Police Department, MIA representative Lori Booker said.

The man was confronted by two airport maintenance workers inside the cockpit, but he managed to get away. The man was later tackled by the workers and held on the ground near the maintenance hangar until police arrived, officials said.

Florida Institute of Technology released this statement: “Florida Institute of Technology has monitored this morning’s incident at Orlando Melbourne International Airport. The university has confirmed that the suspect from Trinidad & Tobago is a part-time Florida Tech student studying aviation management who had completed some flight training in the past. It would be inappropriate for the university to release the suspect’s name, and law enforcement is continuing its investigation. University officials will collaborate with authorities to further review this matter. No additional information is available at this time.”

Update 7:59 a.m. EDT Sept. 20: Airport officials said a college student with a pilot’s license breached airport security and boarded a full-size passenger jet that was undergoing maintenance.

The student jumped the fence to gain access, officials said. An airport employee saw the man enter the Airbus 321, and called airport police, MIA representative Lori Booker said.

Airport police apprehended the man and called Melbourne police.

>> On WFTV.com: Check your flight status

"Melbourne Police Department responded within two minutes, " Booker said.

The student's car, which was parked outside the terminal, was towed after a robotic device searched it, Booker said. 

The FBI and the Terrorist Task Force also assisted in the investigation. 

The man, whose name has not been released, was born in Trinidad and entered the U.S. through Canada, Booker said. 

Booker also said the man had a Florida driver's license.

Update 7:08 a.m. EDT Sept. 20: The airport has reopened, Melbourne police tweeted just before 7 a.m. EDT Thursday. Travelers should check with their air carriers to see whether their flight was delayed, police said.

Original report: Florida’s Orlando Melbourne International Airport is closed due to police activity, officials said Thursday morning.

>> Read more trending news 

All flights have been suspended, officials said.

Police are asking people to avoid the area.

The airport will be closed until further notice, police said.

Melbourne officials said that a college student with a pilot’s license breached airport security and boarded a full-size passenger jet that was undergoing maintenance.

The student jumped the fence to gain access, officials said.

The student was apprehended by airport police.

The airport is being secured, and the student’s car that is parked outside the terminal is being investigated. 

The student’s name has not been released.

 – Visit WFTV.com for the latest on this developing story.

National Public Lands Day 2018: Get free admission to national parks Saturday

Want to experience the great outdoors this weekend? You're in luck: Hundreds of parks across the country are offering free admission Saturday, Sept. 22, for National Public Lands Day.

According to the National Park Service, the event, held each year on September's fourth Saturday, "celebrates the connection between people and green space in their community, inspires environmental stewardship, and encourages use of open space for education, recreation and general health." The event is marking its 25th anniversary this year.

>> See a list of participating parks here

Although participating parks will waive admission fees Saturday, they may still charge for concessions, camping, tours or other services, KGUN reported.

Several parks also will be holding volunteer projects. If you'd like to participate, "you will receive a fee-free day coupon to be used on a future date," the National Park Service said.

>> Read more trending news 

Park-goers are encouraged to share photos on social media with the hashtags #NPLD, #FindYourPark and #NPSVolunteer.

Read more here or here.

Museum Day 2018: 1,500 museums offering free admission Saturday

Smithsonian magazine would like you to be their guest at a museum this weekend.

Museum Day is an annual “celebration of boundless curiosity,” according to Smithsonian.com. The organization will provide free admission for two people at nearly 1,500 museums across the country on Saturday, Sept. 22. 

>> Read more trending news 

Participating cultural institutions can be found on the website, and participants can download one ticket per email address.

For more information about Smithsonian magazine Museum Day, click here

Sugar content of most yogurts above recommended limits, study says

Yogurt has long been touted as a healthy alternative to candy or other sweets. 

Studies have found yogurt is a good source of probiotics, protein, calcium, iodine and vitamin B.

>> Read more trending news 

new study in BMJ (formerly the British Medical Journal), however, has determined most supermarket yogurt is not as healthy as people think, because of its sugar content. 

Dietary guidelines in the United States and United Kingdom recommend low-fat, low-sugar dairy products, and researchers wanted to test how well yogurt products adhered to those standards. BMJ especially wanted to look at yogurts marketed to children, because children under age 3 in the U.K. consume more yogurt than any other age group.

To determine “low fat” and “low sugar,” BMJ researchers used European Union regulations: 3 grams of fat per 100 grams or less of yogurt, 1.5 grams or less for drinks, and a maximum of 5 grams of total sugars per 100 grams.

For this study, researchers looked at the nutritional content of 921 supermarket yogurts and yogurt products. The products were then divided in to eight categories: children's; dairy alternatives, such as soy; desserts; drinks; flavored; fruit; natural/Greek; and organic.

The worst offenders were products in the flavored, fruit, organic and children’s categories, which had a median sugar content between 10.8 and 13.1 grams per 100 grams. As Popular Science pointed out, “100 grams is about 3.5 ounces, and a standard yogurt cup in the U.S. is 5 or 5.3 ounces.”

That means one of those tiny yogurt cups is giving you about half your recommended sugar intake for the day. The recommended daily sugar intake is 25 grams for women and 38 grams for men.

The unsweetened, plain yogurts — Greek and natural — contained only 5 grams of sugar per 100 grams of product, which is healthy.

BMJ researchers found that "while yogurt may be less of a concern than soft drinks and fruit juices, the chief sources of free sugars in both children and adults' diets, what is worrisome is that yogurt, as a perceived 'healthy food,' may be an unrecognised source of free/added sugars in the diet."

They concluded that "not all yogurts are as healthy as perhaps consumers perceive them, and reformulation for the reduction of free sugars is warranted."

Popular Science compiled data from U.S. markets as a comparison. The healthiest yogurts in its study were Chobani whole milk plain and Chobani nonfat strawberry, with 5.0 and 5.3 grams of sugar, respectively.

The worst offenders were Brown Cow whole milk strawberry and Dannon lowfat strawberry on the bottom yogurts. Each contained 22 grams of sugar, or nearly an entire day’s recommended intake.

NBA star Russell Westbrook, wife Nina expecting twin girls

NBA star Russell Westbrook and his wife, Nina, announced Tuesday they are expecting twin girls in a YouTube video produced by the Oklahoma City Thunder.

>> Watch the news report here

>> Need something to lift your spirits? Read more uplifting news 

The video is called "The Westbrook Family." Nina lets out the news they're having twins 2:12 into the video. Russell mentions they will be girls at the 2:28 mark.

> Watch the video here

The couple already have a 1-year-old son named Noah.

>> Read more trending news 

Russell had arthroscopic knee surgery last week. The seven-time All-Star and former MVP is expected to miss preseason and may not be ready for the start of the regular season. The Thunder's first game is Oct. 16 at Golden State.

Test Story on 9.18

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Hurricane Florence: Trucker driving school bus rescues 64 dogs, cats from South Carolina

A Tennessee truck driver is being hailed as a hero after he rescued 64 shelter dogs and cats ahead of Hurricane Florence.

>> On WSOCTV.com: Florence’s aftermath: The latest news from the Carolinas

According to the Greenvale News, Tony Alsup, 51, from Greenback, Tennessee, drove a school bus to South Carolina last week as the deadly storm strengthened in the Atlantic. Once there, he stopped in Orangeburg, Georgetown, Dillon and North Myrtle Beach, picking up 53 dogs and 11 cats from area animal shelters.

>> Read more trending news 

“It’s so easy for people to adopt the small pets and the cuties and the cuddly,” Alsup, of Tony's Emergency Animal Rescue and Shelter, told the Greenvale News. “We take on the ones that deserve a chance even though they are big and a little ugly. But I love big dogs, and we find places for them.”

Related: Hurricane Florence: Coast Guard rescues beagles by boatful in floodwater

He drove them to a shelter in Foley, Alabama, which will distribute the animals to other shelters across the nation, the newspaper reported

Saint Frances Animal Center in Georgetown praised Alsup in a Facebook post Tuesday.

>> Need something to lift your spirits? Read more uplifting news 

"It's all true," the post said of Alsup, who also has saved animals from hurricane-hit Puerto Rico, Texas and Florida. "Tony swooped in at 4 a.m. Wednesday morning to pick up our 'leftovers' – the dogs with blocky heads, the ones with heartworm. The ones no one else will ever take. And he got them to safety. Not the most conventional evacuation, but surely the one with the most heart."

>> See the post here

Read more here.

Are household disinfectants making kids overweight? Study finds possible link

Obesity affects nearly 1 in 6 children in the United States, according to new data from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s State of Obesity report. And new findings from the Canadian Medical Association Journal reveal there may be more contributing to that stat than overeating.

>> On AJC.com: Georgia adult, teen obesity rates among worst in America

Overweight children are approximately five times more likely to be obese or overweight as adults, increasing risk for chronic diseases and health issues like diabetes, hypertension and obesity-related cancers. While some people are more likely to be affected by obesity — older women, Hispanic men and black women — new research suggests postnatal exposure to certain household disinfectants may be linked to being overweight.

>> On AJC.com: One-third of all humans are now overweight — and American children are leading the way

The findings, published Monday in the CMAJ, involve data from the Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development study, which began in 2009.

Researchers closely followed participants from mid-pregnancy into childhood and adolescence and examined fecal samples for infants at 3-4 months of age in addition to survey responses about their home and use of disinfectant products.

>> On AJC.com: 5 things moms can do to reduce child obesity risk, according to a new study

Of the 757 infants profiled, 80 percent came from households that used disinfectant products on a weekly basis, typically multi-surface cleaners. The emphasis on cleanliness, researchers said, has led to widening use of the products.

In the study, they noted an increase of a gut bacteria called Lachnospiraceae in infant stool with increased use of disinfectants or eco-friendly cleaners, but they found no similar association when washing detergents without the bacteria-killing ingredients were used.

>> On AJC.com: Obesity linked to 11 types of cancer as overweight population grows, study says 

It’s known “from animal studies that higher levels of Lachnospiraceaehave been associated with higher body fat and insulin resistance,” senior author Anita Kozyrskyj said in a podcast related to the research.

According to the findings, infants from households that used antimicrobial disinfectants weekly were twice as likely to have higher levels of Lachnospiraceae and then, after age 3, they were also more likely to have a higher body mass index than children from homes where disinfectants were not as frequently used.

In addition to higher levels of Lachnospiraceae, infants from frequent disinfectant use households had lowered abundance of Haemophilusand Clostridium bacteria, a combined profile similar to children with eczema.

>> On AJC.com: Study: Strain on parents’ time linked to childhood obesity

“Elevated fecal abundance of Lachnospiraceae (specifically Blautia) concurrent with lowered Haemophilus is also a signature of diabetes, as shown in a study on 11-year-old children,” researchers wrote.

“These results suggest that gut microbiota were the culprit in the association between disinfectant use and the overweight,” Kozyrskyj added in the podcast interview.

Gut microbiota, gut flora or gastrointestinal microbiota refers to the “complex community of microorganisms that live in the digestive tract,” according to the National Institutes of Health.

>> On AJC.com: Scientists discover surprisingly simple way to fight childhood obesity

“Indeed, concerns over the potential for antibacterial products to be too effective or even toxic has motivated use of “green” or eco-friendly alternatives,” researchers said. 

But though eco-friendly alternatives showed different microbiota and lower levels of the bacteria Enterobacteriaceae, plus lower rates of overweight children, study authors didn’t provide a link between the altered gut microbiota and reduced childhood obesity or overweight risk.

Due to the lack of convincing data, Kozyrskyj told CNN she’s not ready to recommend eco-friendly alternatives, but she has personally switched out popular disinfectants with DIY vinegar cleaning solutions.

>> Read more trending news 

Kozyrskyj and her colleagues concluded that antibacterial cleaning products “have the capacity to change the environmental microbiome and alter risk for child overweight,” but further research into the mechanisms through which the products alter gut microbiota and the impact on metabolism is needed.

Read the full study at cmaj.ca.

UPS hiring 100,000 workers for holiday shipping season

UPS said it is hiring about 100,000 temporary workers for the holiday shipping season.

The jobs are to help handle the huge volume of packages shipped starting in November through January 2019.

>> Read more trending news 

The full-time and part-time seasonal jobs are for package handlers, drivers and driver-helpers, and can be an entry point for a full-time job at the shipping giant.

Many UPS executives, including CEO David Abney, started out as part-time workers, and the company says about 35 percent of the people hired as seasonal package handlers get permanent positions after the holidays.

Those interested can apply at UPSjobs.com.

Hurricane Florence aftermath: Journalists rescue woman from car stuck in floodwaters

They were in the right place at the right time

>> Watch the news report here

>> On WSOCTV.com: Tracking Florence: Live updates from the Carolinas

Reporter Chris Jose and photojournalist Brandon Bryant with Atlanta's WSB-TV, which is owned by Cox Media Group, have been in South Carolina covering what is now tropical depression Florence. The two are making their way to Fayetteville, North Carolina, to cover the flooding and damage left by the storm there. 

>> On WSBTV.com: 3-month-old the latest death due to Florence. Here's what we know about the victims

They were driving up Interstate 95 when they found the roadway flooded over around Latta, South Carolina. 

Jose said they decided to take some of the back country roads to get around the flooding when they ran across a woman who was stuck inside her car, with floodwater rapidly rising up around it. 

>> On WSBTV.com: Convoy of Care: Here's how you can help Hurricane Florence victims

The two said the woman was yelling, "Help me! Help me!” The area was under a tornado warning, adding to the already dangerous situation. 

Knowing they had to do something, Jose said he drove their SUV as far as they could into the water without getting stuck and Bryant, wearing a pair of waders, got out into the water, which was about waist-deep.

When Bryant got to the woman’s car, he found Barbara Flanagan inside, praying. 

"It just pulled me in and I couldn’t stop it. I had my foot on the brake, but it wouldn’t stop," Flanagan said. 

>> On WSOCTV.com: Looters clean out Family Dollar amid storm damage

Bryant said he told Flanagan he was going to open the door and that water was going to come flooding in, be she was going to be alright. 

He got the door open and was able to grab the woman and help her out her car. 

"I couldn't leave you out there," Bryant told the woman. “My heart wouldn’t allow me.”

>> On WSBTV.com: Disaster relief organization offering help as Florence moves through

As they made their way through the floodwaters, Flanagan told Bryant she was from Georgia and was a worker with the USDA, who was responding to the area for storm relief. 

She said some of her coworkers had taken the same route shortly before her and the road was clear. 

>> Read more trending news 

"Looks can be deceiving," Flanagan told Jose. "Don’t go through the water."

A man in a pickup truck pulled up behind the WSB-TV crew’s SUV and offered to help get the woman’s car out of the floodwater. The woman’s car was still able to run, despite the high water. 

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