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Posted: October 25, 2016

Elizabeth Smart says motherhood changed how she thought about her abduction

NEW YORK, NY - MARCH 11: Honoree Elizabeth Smart addresses the audience during the 2nd Annual Diller-von Furstenberg Awards at United Nations on March 11, 2011 in New York City. (Photo by Michael Loccisano/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - MARCH 11: Honoree Elizabeth Smart addresses the audience during the 2nd Annual Diller-von Furstenberg Awards at United Nations on March 11, 2011 in New York City. (Photo by Michael Loccisano/Getty Images)

By Nicole Moschella

In a recent interview with People magazine, Elizabeth Smart talked about how becoming a mother helped her realize her parents' perspective while she was missing.

"Nobody should have to go through the aftermath of a terrible crime alone," she told People.

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Smart, 28, was kidnapped from her Salt Lake City home in 2002 and was held captive for nine months. In that time, she was repeatedly raped and starved by her captors, Brian David Mitchell and Wanda Ileen Barzee.

Now a true-crime reporter, Smart said that talking to the parents of victims has greatly affected her since she gave birth to her own daughter, Chloe, in February 2015.

"When I go back to my own situation, I almost think it was worse for my parents than for me," she told People. "Because I knew that I was alive, but they didn't know. I always knew how much they loved me, but until I had my own daughter, I didn't realize how all-consuming that is. The worst thing in the world would be if something happened to my little girl."

Smart said she decided to continue her work with Crime Watch Daily because she believes that keeping the stories of kidnapped victims in the media will help solve some of the cases.

"I decided to continue because sharing the stories of survivors is a way to keep their cases in the spotlight and hopefully give them a better chance of bringing criminals to justice," Smart said. "The power of the media is so strong. I know that in my own experience, if my parents hadn't kept my story alive in the press, it might have been just another sad story that came and went. So the opportunity to talk to other victims and survivors means a lot to me and to them."

Read more at People.


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