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Hurricane Irma: Tim Tebow works with Florida Gov. Rick Scott in preparing for storm

Tim Tebow is doing charitable things once again.

>> Click here for complete Hurricane Irma coverage from the Palm Beach Post

Per "The Paul Finebaum Show," the former Florida Gators quarterback is working alongside Gov. Rick Scott in helping the Sunshine State prepare for Hurricane Irma, which is supposed to arrive this weekend.

>> Hurricane Irma: Live updates

Irma already has caused the cancellation of several college football games, including the Gators hosting Northern Colorado on Saturday. Miami decided not to travel to Arkansas State, and South Florida vs. Connecticut also was postponed.

>> PHOTOS: Hurricane Irma approaches Florida

Scott has been asking Florida citizens to volunteer to assist those who are in need as the disastrous storm heads their way.

>> Read more trending news

People willing to volunteer can go to VolunteerFlorida.org to sign up.

J.J. Watt’s Harvey fundraising pushes past $20 million

J.J. Watt’s rush to continue raising money for the victims of Hurricane Harvey and the historic flooding in and around Houston that followed the Aug. 25-30 storm broke the $20 million mark, as his online crowdfunding site pushed past that threshold about 12:30 p.m. Tuesday, according to USA Today.

>> George Strait, Beyonce, others to hold Hurricane Harvey relief concert

Watt pledged $100,000 to the Red Cross fund when he started it with the goal of raising $200,000.

>> Read more trending news

“It’s such a testament to the people out there," Watt said Sunday after donations of $1 million from Tennessee Titans owner Amy Adams Strunk, $1 million from Walmart, $200,000 from hip-hop artist Drake and $50,000 from NBA star Chris Paul.

Watt, an all-pro defensive end for the Houston Texans, said Sunday when the total raised was at $17 million. “It’s such a testament to how much good there is in the world.’’

>> Complete Harvey coverage from the Austin American-Statesman

Many NFL owners and players have pledged money to Harvey victims, including Falcons owner Arthur Blank, who has committed $1 million.

Red Sox accused of using Apple Watches to steal pitching signs from Yankees

The Boston Red Sox are facing allegations of cheating in a situation reminiscent of the 2007 New England Patriots Spygate controversy.

>> Watch the news report here

Red Sox President of Baseball Operations Dave Dombrowski confirmed accusations that the Red Sox had been stealing pitching signs in a news conference Tuesday afternoon.

>> On Boston25News.com: Red Sox, Yankees team up to raise money for hurricane relief

The allegations stem from a Red Sox vs Yankees series at Fenway Park in mid-August when, according to the New York Times, staff members and Red Sox players used Apple Watches as a way to share the signals.

“Do I think sign stealing is wrong? No, I don’t," Dombrowski said. “People are trying to win it however they can. It’s an edge we can gain.”

MLB has not prohibited players from looking at catcher signals and relaying the information to others, but they have said any use of technology to see signals is against the rules.

The Times also reports that the Red Sox have filed a complaint against the Yankees for using broadcast cameras to steal pitching signals, and while he would not go into details, MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred confirmed that there were allegations on both sides.

>> Read more trending news

“We actually do not have a rule against sign stealing, and it has been a part of the game for the long time,” he said. “It’s the electronic equipment that creates the violation, and I think the rule against electronic equipment has a number of reasons behind it.”

Manfred said the investigation is not complete into allegations on either side, and that it was too soon to talk about possible discipline. He did, however, indicate that taking away wins was unlikely because it is difficult to determine "to what extent this impacted the outcome of any particular game."

Photos: Mayweather beats McGregor with 10th-round TKO

Floyd Mayweather Jr. (50-0) defeated UFC champion Conor McGregor in a highly anticipated fight Saturday night at the T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas.

Mayweather-McGregor fight: Mayweather finishes off McGregor in 10th round

We have a winner!

>> PHOTOS: Mayweather beats McGregor with 10th round TKO

The superfight between Conor McGregor and Floyd Mayweather captivated the nation, and with an audience of millions, Mayweather (50-0) finished McGregor (0-1) with a technical knock out in the 10th round.

>> Floyd Mayweather vs. Conor McGregor: By the numbers

Mayweather announced after the fight that this would be his last match, and he praised McGregor for lasting as long as he did.

>> Read more trending news

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Ringside physicians worry about McGregor's safety

Saturday’s anticipated bout between undefeated boxer Floyd Mayweather and mixed martial arts champion Conor McGregor promises to be a box office smash. However, members of the Association of Ringside Physicians believe that the fight is a mismatch and that McGregor could be in physical danger, The New York Times reported.

>> Read more trending news

The group  comprises more than 100 ringside doctors with decades of experience in handling major fights.

“We were very surprised this bout was even sanctioned and was going to be permitted to carry on,” said Larry Lovelace, a doctor and the president of the organization, which is focused on preserving fighter safety. “The thing I really fear, truly fear, is that somebody’s going to get really hurt in this upcoming fight.”In June, Tim Hague, 34, a mixed martial artist turned boxer, sustained fatal injuries against Adam Braidwood in Edmonton, Alberta. It was Hague’s fourth professional boxing match after competing in 34 MMA fights.While McGregor, 29, compiled a 21-3 record in mixed martial arts, in which the rules allow him to use his feet and wrestle opponents to the ground, the Nevada State Athletic Commission decided that he was simply a premier athlete who belonged in the ring with Mayweather, who is 49-0.“If you’re going to take the position that Conor has never had an amateur or professional fight, then I’m not going to change your mind,” Bob Bennett, the executive director of the commission, told the Times. “If you look at him today versus Floyd Mayweather, Conor is the taller, longer, stronger, more powerful opponent. He’s also a southpaw, which makes it a little more difficult for a conventional fighter. He’s 12 years younger than Floyd.”Hall of Fame referee Richard Steele said he was not sure he would have sanctioned the bout.“Here’s a guy from one sport, challenging the world’s best in his own sport — I really don’t know how it’s going to work,” Steele told the Times. “McGregor can’t kick. He can’t elbow. He can’t do nothing. Nothing that he’s used to doing that makes him a great MMA fighter.”The Nevada boxing commission has a particularly large financial stake in the Mayweather-McGregor bout, the Times reported. The state receives 8 percent of the gross revenue from every ticket sold at a boxing event in Nevada, and the commission gets 25 percent of that amount.

According to Leonard Ellerbe, the chief executive of Mayweather Promotions, and Dana White, the president of the Ultimate Fighting Championship, more than $60 million in tickets have been sold for the fight, which means Nevada stands to receive in excess of $4.8 million, with the athletic commission’s cut topping $1.2 million.

McGregor and Mayweather will wear eight-ounce gloves for their middleweight bout instead of the 10-ounce gloves typically mandated for fighters in the 154-pound weight class. 

“I don’t think that’s the commission’s role, to try to affect the fight, or to try to affect ticket sales,” Lovelace told the Times.

Bennett denied that the commission was putting its finances ahead of fighter safety.

“As a regulator, I take offense to the fact that we’re approving this fight for fiduciary reasons,” he told the Times. “That’s totally unfair, and it’s simply not true.”

Floyd Mayweather vs. Conor McGregor: By the numbers

Big deal or big hype? We’ll find out Saturday night when Floyd Mayweather meets Conor McGregor in a super welterweight boxing match in Las Vegas.

>> Read more trending news

Mayweather is 49-0 and has won 12 world titles in five weight classes. He is coming out of two years of inactivity to fight McGregor, the UFC star who is 21-3 as a professional.

Here are some last-minute numbers to crunch as the opening bell draws near:

8 oz. -- The size of the boxing gloves the two fighters will use. Normally, boxers use 10 oz. gloves in fights sanctioned by the Nevada State Athletic Commission.

12 rounds -- The scheduled length of the bout. "It won't go the distance, mark my words," Mayweather said. 

26 -- The number of knockouts in Mayweather’s pro career.

40 -- Mayweather’s age. It could be a factor against McGregor, who is 29.

74 inches – McGregor’s reach when throwing punches – he will hold a two-inch advantage over Mayweather.

$99.95 – The cost to order a high-definition broadcast of the fight on pay-per-view.

154 pounds – The official weight limit in the fight. At Friday’s weigh-in, Mayweather tipped the scales at 149.5 pounds, CBS Sports reported. McGregor, making his pro boxing debut, weighed in at 153 pounds.

3,360 – The number of diamonds included on “The Money Belt,” which will be awarded to the fight’s winner. The belt also will include 600 sapphires and 300 emeralds.

20,000 -- The seating capacity of Las Vegas’s T-Mobile Arena, where the bout will be held.

4.9 million – The number of pay-per-view orders that UFC chief Dana White expects the fight to draw, which would be a record.

$300 million – The amount of money Mayweather said he will earn from the match. “Just being real. They call me ‘Money Mayweather’ for a reason,” he told Fox Business in an email interview. McGregor is set to earn anywhere from $50 million to $100 million, according to various estimates. Both fighters approved a confidential agreement on how the purse will be split, Rare reported. Mayweather is guaranteed $100 million.

$700 million – Projected revenue for Mayweather vs. McGregor from pay-per-view buys, ticket sales and other sources of income,. By comparison, Mayweather’s record-breaking match with Manny Pacquiao in 2015 yielded an estimated $600 million.

NYPD officers support Colin Kaepernick at rally

Police officers in New York City are throwing their badges behind polarizing figure Colin Kaepernick.

The former football star came under heavy criticism for kneeling during the national anthem last year and remains unsigned by any team.

On Saturday, a group of NYPD officers showed up at an event in support of Kaepernick.

Sgt. Edwin Raymond told the New York Daily News: “What Colin Kaepernick did is try to bring awareness that this nation, unfortunately, has ignored for far too long. ... And that’s the issue of racism in America and policing in America. We decided to gather here today because of the way he’s being railroaded for speaking the obvious truth.”

>> Read more trending news

Officers wore black shirts with #WeStandWithKap scrawled across their chests. Supporters of the quarterback insist that he’s been blackballed for his behavior.

One said, “The fact that Kaepernick is not in the NFL has nothing to do with stats on the football field.”

Even legendary NYPD officer Frank Serpico returned to his old stomping grounds to attend the rally and show his support for the former 49er. He said, “I am here to support anyone who has the courage to stand up against injustice and oppression anywhere in this country and the world.”

In related news, filmmaker Spike Lee made headlines two weeks ago when he tweeted that would be a rally for Kaepernick in New York City called “United We Stand,” taking place on Aug. 23.

Charles Barkley offers brutally honest take on Confederate statue debate

Former basketball star Charles Barkley recently weighed in on an argument that has the entire nation riled up: the removal of Confederate statues.

>> Watch the interview here

“I’m not going to waste my time worrying about these Confederate statues. ... I’m going to keep doing great things, No. 1 in the black community because I’m black,” Barkley said in an interview with Rick Karle of WBRC.

>> Charlie Daniels compares Confederate statue removal to ISIS' actions

He continued: “I’m not going to waste my time worrying about a neo-Nazi who’s going to hate me no matter what.”

>> There are hundreds of Confederate monuments, not just in the South

When asked if the best option is to leave the statues up and ignore them, Barkley answered, “I’ve always ignored them. I’m 54 years old; I’ve never thought about those statues a day in my life. I think if you ask most black people, to be honest, they haven’t thought a day in their life about those stupid statues.”

Barkley has weighed in before on the Confederate statue and flag debate. In 2004, he said he was on his way to a NASCAR race and turned around when he saw 10 Confederate flags.

>> Read more trending news

Barkley was a star player with the Philadelphia 76ers and then with the Phoenix Suns, where he earned the NBA Most Valuable Player award.

Photos: 2017 Pro Football Hall of Fame induction ceremony

Morton Andersen, Terrell Davis, Kenny Easley, Jerry Jones, Jason Taylor, LaDainian Tomlinson and Kurt Warner were inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame on Aug. 5, 2017.

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