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World's first Nutella Cafe opening in Chicago

The Nutella counter at the Chicago Eataly hub has enjoyed success, and the company has decided to erect a flagship Nutella Cafe in Chicago, just across from Millennium Park Plaza, on May 31.

A representative from Nutella told Chicago Eater that the two-story bar will be “the first to truly capture the essence of the Nutella brand -- not just in the dishes that’ll be served, but in the full experience.”

>> Read more trending news

The cafe will be two levels and will branch out from the bar at Eataly.

In addition to Nutella products, the location will serve soups, salads and paninis. The Chicago Nutella Cafe will also serve breakfast, lunch, dinner, gelato, crepes and espresso, according to Eater.

>> Related: An Italian deli institution of Chicago is sadly shutting its doors after nearly 70 years

While Chicago will have the world’s first Nutella Cafe, the company has similar locations all over the world, including a shop in Palestine and kiosks in Sao Paulo.

According to their website, Nutella originated in 1946 when a shortage of cocoa supplies after the second World War caused an inventive pastry maker in Italy to begin using hazelnuts in his spreads. Today, the company is worth billions of dollars.

14-year-old graduates from college with physics degree

Last week, 14-year-old Carson Huey-You became Texas Christian University’s youngest graduate, earning a bachelor of science degree in physics and minors in math and Chinese.

His mother, Claretta Kimp, said he started learning calculus when he was 3, and she credits her availability as a stay-at-home mother, as well as TCU’s community of faculty and teachers, to her oldest son’s achievements.

“It feels like it was meant to be he would come here,” senior associate dean Dr. Magnus Rittby said of Carson. “There are a lot of reasons why it was successful, and I think it’s very hard not to love Carson and the person he is. He’s not some abrasive kid who think he’s smarter than everyone else, but actually, he is smarter than everyone else.”

Carson enrolled at TCU when he was 11

“When I used to get bad test scores or something like that, I would go home and be disappointed and think about, ‘Oh, I should have known this, I should have done way better,’” he told the Star-Telegram.

Now, he’s learned how to react to an unexpected result.

“I know better how to deal with that disappointment, knowing that I will bounce back,” he said.

Carson’s aptitude for subatomic particles and learning will continue this fall, when he will return to TCU to pursue his master’s degree. The young scholar hopes to eventually earn a Ph.D. and teach in the field.

>> Related: Move over, Mozart! History’s newest premiere pianists are among us, and they’re in Houston

Genius seems to be a family affair: His 11-year-old brother, Cannan, is set to join Carson at TCU this fall, studying for a degree in astronomy.

While the curriculum and environment of college can be quite adult, the boys’ advisers and mother are dedicated to providing the boys with opportunities to be young.

>> Related: Texas lawmakers want you to be able to get your bachelor’s degree at community colleges

“This is where they can continue to learn and grow physically, spiritually, emotionally in every aspect of which your child needs to grow,” Kimp said of TCU’s investment in hers sons. “They don’t feel like, ‘Oh, I’m in a school with a bunch of grown-ups,’ and everything. They feel more like, ‘Hey, this is my family. This is my team. These are the people who really care about me.’”

“TCU is where I’ve grown up,” Carson said. “It’s home.”

Chick-fil-A adds new sandwich, lemonade to summer menu

Chick-fil-A is offering its customers the savory tastes of a backyard barbecue with two new summer menu items.

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The Atlanta-based fast food chain introduced its new Smokehouse BBQ Bacon Sandwich and Watermelon Mint Lemonade on Monday. The summer sandwich and beverage will be rolled out nationwide at all Chick-fil-A locations today through Aug. 19.

The barbecue sandwich includes up Chick-fil-A’s signature grilled chicken with bacon glazed in a brown sugar pepper blend and Colby Jack cheese on a Hawaiian-style bun, topped with a smokehouse barbecue sauce. The 500-calorie sandwich costs $5.59 before tax.

The new minty beverage, which Chick-fil-A suggests pairing with the Smokehouse BBQ Bacon Sandwich, adds watermelon and mint flavors to the chain’s beloved fresh-squeezed lemonade at 200 calories. A small drink costs $1.85 and is also available in a diet variety.

Chick-fil-A backs its new seasonal sandwich up with science, reporting more than 95 percent of U.S. consumers like barbecue.

“We know our customers love the flavors of our grilled menu, and we are excited to offer two items this season that will give them something new to try,” David Farmer, Chick-fil-A vice president of menu strategy and development, said in a news release.

The Smokehouse BBQ Bacon Sandwich “was incredibly popular in test markets. I hope our customers are as excited as I am to get this kind of high-quality sandwich at the drive-thru,” Farmer said. “We hope customers will enjoy the new ingredients and flavor combinations in our Smokehouse BBQ Bacon Sandwich and Watermelon Mint Lemonade all summer long.”

>> Four Atlanta restaurants are the 'best barbecue joints in America,' according to ranking

Chick-fil-A added another limited-time menu item in March when it introduced the Frosted Strawberry Lemonade, a spin on the Frosted Lemonade, which the company introduced in 2015. The Frosted Strawberry Lemonade, described by Chick-fil-A as a “seasonal twist on a customer favorite,” is a combination of Chick-fil-A’s signature lemonade, the vanilla Icedream and strawberry purée. It’s being offered nationwide through May 20.

Brianna Chambers contributed to this report. 

Parents call school's 'hair policy' racist

Parents are calling a "hair policy" at a Massachusetts charter school racist after they said black female students are being suspended and disciplined for wearing braided hair extensions. 

>> Read more trending news 

“I was kind of shocked because for years everyone has been able to wear braids,” said Maya Cook, a sophomore at Mystic Valley Regional Charter in Malden, Massachusetts.

Parents of two students told WFXT that their daughters have been kicked off their sports teams and barred from prom at Mystic Valley Regional Charter as discipline for refusing to take out their braided extensions. Others have been suspended, but the parents said they're not backing down.

Cook said school officials first pulled her aside two weeks ago after she and her sister, Deanna Cook, both African-American, had their hair braided at a local salon.

Their adoptive mother, Colleen Cook, received a call from the school.

“The school basically said that they didn't want anything artificial or unnatural in their hair,” said Colleen Cook.

The school's policy says students cannot have a hairstyle that is distracting to other students, and hair extensions are not allowed. Colleen Cook argued that the policy targets only black students.

“We told them there's nothing wrong with their hair the way it is. Their hair is beautiful, there's no correcting that needs to be done,” said Colleen Cook.

Deanna Cook said hair extensions and braids are integral to African American culture.

"It makes me feel like my culture and my hair was not important enough to be represented around the school," Deanna Cook told WFXT.

The Cook girls refused to take out their braided extensions and were punished with daily detention. Colleen Cook said it became worse last week.

“All the little black children were marched down for a hair inspection, whether they had braids or not, and asked, ‘Are those extensions? Are your braids real or not?’” said Colleen Cook.

In a statement, school officials told WFXT: “Our policies ... foster a culture that emphasizes education rather than style, fashion or materialism. Our policy on hair extensions, which tend to be very expensive, is consistent with ... the educational environment that we believe is so important to our students’ success.”

Colleen Cook said the school’s policy doesn’t send a message of success to her daughters.

“It really affects them to their core and tells them, ‘You're not good enough, you need to change,’” she said.

She has filed a complaint with the NAACP and the anti-defamation league and said that so far, there has been no response from school officials.

Mystic Valley Regional Charter released the following statement from Alexander J. Dan, the school’s interim director:  

“The Mystic Valley Regional Charter School serves a diverse student population from surrounding communities that include Everett, Medford and Malden, among other cities. The school consistently ranks among the top schools in Massachusetts in MCAS testing, SAT testing and college admissions. We send students from all walks of life, including those of color and those from limited means, to the best colleges and universities in the nation. 

“One important reason for our students’ success is that we purposefully promote equity by focusing on what unites our students and reducing visible gaps between those of different means. Our policies, including those governing student appearance and attire, foster a culture that emphasizes education rather than style, fashion or materialism. Our policy on hair extensions, which tend to be very expensive, is consistent with, and a part of, the educational environment that we believe is so important to our students’ success.” 

Editor’s note: An earlier version of this story used the colloquial term “braids” to refer to braided hair extensions. This story has been updated to clarify the wearing of braided extensions. 

10 ways to save money on a trip to the beach

Temperatures are warming up, and the sand and surf are calling.

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A day at the beach is a great and inexpensive summer activity, but costs can creep up if you’re not careful.

Here are some tips on keeping your summer beach costs down:

1. Carpool

If you can easily drive to a beach, you know that it’s hard to find parking spots there. Both private and public beaches can charge an outrageous amount to park.

If you have four people going to the beach and parking is $20 a car, why take two separate cars? Carpool and split the cost among everyone.

>> Related: 10 inexpensive places to get away from it all

2. Bring your own food

There are usually plenty of food trucks, food carts and seaside restaurants around beaches, but the food can be overpriced.

One of the best ways to save money when you visit the beach is to bring a cooler of your own food. Prepare some sandwiches, throw in some fruit or other snacks, drinks, a bag of ice, and you’re good to go.

3. Buy food away from the beach

If you are going to bring your own food to the beach, consider buying groceries outside the beach town. Food prices tend to be almost double in high tourist areas because local markets know they can jack up the prices and people will pay.

4. Stay cheap

Consider booking a room in a motel or renting out someone’s summer house. You might not have a beautiful room, but there’s a good chance you’ll be paying significantly less, and the purpose of visiting the beach is to be outside, not in your room all day.

>> Related: 7 things more hotels are giving away for free

It’s also a great time to consider camping in areas where that’s acceptable. Get a tent and fall asleep to the sound of the waves.

5. Get a non-waterfront hotel

If you want to stay in a hotel, renting a room in a hotel that is not on the waterfront will save you money. Hotels close to the beach tend to be more expensive than hotels that are farther away from the beach, but sometimes the distance is no more than a few blocks and easily walkable.

6. Find free activities

While it might be tempting to rent jet skis or go scuba diving, those costs can climb quickly. Think about what you can do on a lower budget. For example, get some cheap snorkeling gear and explore the waters that way, instead of spending money on a scuba excursion.

7. Avoid beachfront stores

Beachfront stores are filled with touristy junk -- poorly made knickknacks that will fall apart and beach equipment that is overpriced. For example, you might find beach umbrellas there for twice the amount you’d find miles away.

Buy your towels, chairs, bags and umbrellas before you go on vacation or at a non-beach-related store away from the hotels and beaches.

>> Related: 7 things you should never buy at the airport

8. Budget

This is a basic need for any vacation, but it’s easy to look at a few days at the beach and think you won’t spend much money. You’ll probably be right, but there are other things on which you might spend your money, such as food, entertainment or souvenirs. Going on vacation without a set budget can easily cause you to spend more money than you intended.

9. Go during the offseason

Offseason is a relative term for a beach vacation. Offseason on Cape Cod is much different than it is in Florida.

Offseasons are generally from September to November or late February to early May. You’ll find that hotels and flights are cheaper and they’ll be less hassle while you’re visiting the beach and other attractions.

10. Transportation

Many large, popular beaches are near many different amenities and attractions. You might want to see what type of public transportation is available or if you’ll need to rent a car. If there is a decent public transportation system, take advantage of it instead of renting a car.

Better yet, if everything you need is nearby, walk everywhere.

If you’re planning day activities, your hotel might also have free shuttle services.

>> Related: Adult summer camp with alcohol, no counselors, debuting in new cities this year

Chipotle to debut first dessert

Chipotle plans to add a dessert item to its menu this year.

The Denver-based Mexican grill announced Tuesday it will begin testing a fried dough dessert next month, Business Insider reported

>> Read more trending news

Chipotle’s buñuelos, a traditional Mexican dessert, are fried tortillas sprinkled with honey, cinnamon and sugar. They’re to be served with caramel-apple dipping sauce.

“It’s simple to make and requires us to add just a few additional ingredients,” Chipotle CEO Steve Ells said, according to Yahoo. “They’re delicious and complement our menu nicely.”

It’s unclear which locations nationwide will offer the dessert first. 

Although Chipotle announced last year that it would be adding a dessert item to the menu, the buñuelo comes as a surprise, as many speculated the restaurant chain would debut churros as its first dessert.Chipotle is known for being slow to change its menu. According to Business Insider, the addition of buñuelos will be the company’s third major change in 20 years.

The most recent addition was chorizo, which Chipotle began offering in October. 

The company also announced that sales at restaurants that have been open at least a year rose 17.8 percent in the first quarter, and revenue increased 28.1 percent to $1.07 billion. Chipotle’s stock rose, and Ells said the increases indicates a “strong start” to the year.

>> Related: Here's why Chipotle doesn't sell queso

Girl almost turned away from prom because of dress length

A Florida woman is calling on school leaders to clarify guidelines for what students can wear to prom after confusion and controversy arose over the dress that her daughter wore to the dance.

>> Read more trending news 

Leaders at Sandalwood High School in Jacksonville, Florida, told  Action News Jax that the teenager's dress was too short in the front.

“She’s crying, she’s like, ‘Mom, just come and get me.’ I said, ‘No, you’re going to the prom.’ We spent all of this money, and it doesn’t make any sense for them to say it’s inappropriate,” Nydia Allen said.

>> Related: Florida student wears Black Lives Matter-inspired prom dress

Allen said her daughter called her an hour after she took a picture of her in her dress before prom. Most of the dress touches the ground. The skirt touches her knees in the front.

“She was saying that they said her skirt was too short,” Allen said.

Allen said she bought the dress based on the guidelines outlined in a letter that she said the school sent home.

>> Related: Teen takes 93-year-old grandmother to prom

The letter said dresses must be an appropriate length, but Allen said that when her daughter got to the prom, school leaders told her a different story.

“I asked them to show me what’s inappropriate, and they continued to say, ‘It says it here, it has to be to the ankle,’ and I said, ‘That’s not the paperwork you guys sent home.’ They need to change the way they’re writing these contracts for the students let it be known and make it clear, on what you expect at the prom. She can wear the skirt to school, but she can’t wear it to prom? What’s the difference?” Allen said.

A spokesperson for Duval County Public Schools sent Action News Jax this statement: “For Sandalwood High School, students were made aware in advance that prom dresses must be floor length. To resolve the issue, additional fabric was added to the front of the dress.”

Allen said they tried to add more material to the dress to make it longer, but eventually allowed her daughter in after she put on black tights. 

>> Related: Jacksonville high school apologizes for 'good girl' prom dress flyers posted in hallways

Starbucks opens 5 'Military Family Stores' for vets and military spouses

Starbucks is working to increase employment opportunities for service members and their families through its “Military Family Stores” initiative.

>> Read more trending news

On Tuesday, the coffee chain’s Clarksville, Tennessee, location became the 37th store designated as a Military Family Store, meaning that it’s now staffed primarily by veterans and military spouses.

“Seventy-five percent of my business is the military,” store manager and military spouse Shannon Feltz, 47, told Fox News. “We are so excited about this announcement. I’ve never felt so supported by a company in my life.”

>> Related: Black Rifle Coffee pledges to hire 10,000 veterans

In addition to the Clarksville location, Starbucks unveiled four other Military Family Stores on Tuesday, including two in Texas serving Camp Mabry in Austin and Ft. Bliss in El Paso, one serving Naval War College in Rhode Island and one in Massachusetts near Joint Base Hanscom. The stores are part of the coffee chain’s efforts to provide jobs to veterans and military spouses while also serving as a place for service members to come together, connect and share stories. The company has pledged to hire 25,000 veterans and military spouses by 2025 and currently employs more than 10,000.

>>  Related: Starbucks responds to criticism over its refugee hiring plan

“Service members and military spouses are the best example of engaged citizens.” Starbucks senior vice president John Kelly said in a statement. “Long after leaving active duty, they continue to vote, volunteer and serve their communities at a high rate, serving as the best examples of citizenship. We are honored to serve as a place where these American heroes can continue to impact their community in a positive way.”

Matt Kress, a U.S. Marine Corps veteran who served in Iraq and now manages the veterans and military affairs program for Starbucks, remembered the “frightening period” when he transitioned from active duty life to civilian life.

“Some of our veterans are only with us for a year, while others are here longer,” Kress told Fox News. “This is their landing spot to figure out what they want to do with the rest of their life.”

Read more at Starbucks Newsroom.

>> Related: Move over, Unicorn Frappuccino; here’s Starbucks’ Dragon Frappe

>> Related: Starbucks barista rants about unicorn Frappuccino drink

Lil Wayne’s daughter to attend Clark Atlanta University

It appears that the daughter of rapper Lil Wayne and his ex, Toya Wright, is set to attend Clark Atlanta University in the fall. 

>> Read more trending news 

Reginae Carter posted a photo on Instagram Monday night of her and Wright standing in front of a CAU sign with the caption, “Mama, we made it.” Wright posted the same photo, writing, “Proud moments.” 

The university posted the photo to social media shortly after, seemingly welcoming Carter to the “#PantherPride Class of 2021” in the fall. 

While a CAU spokesman confirmed that the information in its post is accurate, the school would not confirm outright that Carter will attend school in the fall. But it sure looks like it.

Carter is no stranger to the spotlight. Her birthday celebration at an Atlanta venue was shown on MTV’s “Super Sweet 16” in 2015, an occasion during which her parents gave the homeschooled 10th grader a Ferrari and a BMW X4. She is on the cast of an Atlanta reality spin-off show set to debut this spring: “Growing Up Hip Hop.”

In November, Carter was in the news for defending her father on Instagram after T.I. insulted Lil Wayne over comments he made about the Black Lives Matter movement.

New Jersey teen accepted into all 8 Ivy League schools

It’s good to be Ifeoma White-Thorpe.

>> Read more trending news 

The Denville, New Jersey, high school senior has been accepted into all eight Ivy League schools plus Stanford.

“Harvard, Yale, Columbia, UPenn, Brown, Cornell, Dartmouth, Princeton and Stanford,” White-Thorpe told WABC-TV.

“I was like, I might as well shoot my shot and apply,” White-Thorpe said.

She told WABC-TV now that she’s been accepted into her dream colleges, the hard part is going to be deciding which one to attend when she graduates in June.

“I got into Harvard early action so I figured I’ll just go there. Then I got into all the others, and I was like, wait now I don’t know where I want to go,” White-Thorpe told WABC-TV.

White-Thorpe enrolled in Advanced Placement classes at Morris Hills High School, where she is the student government president.

“I think my love for poetry and writing just really stood out,” she told WABC-TV.

White-Thorpe wants to study biology and go into the global health business.

“Education is essential for change, and I aspire to be that change,” she said earlier in her high school career

The 17-year-old’s parents said they’ll let her decide which school she wants to attend, and White-Thorpe said she’ll make her decision based on financial aid offerings. 

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