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Trump's latest statement 'a declaration of war,' North Korean foreign minister says

North Korea's foreign minister on Monday told reporters that President Donald Trump has issued "a declaration of war" against the Hermit Kingdom in the president’s most recent statements on the country.

>> Read more trending news

However, White House spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders insisted at a news briefing on Monday that no declaration had been made.

“We’ve not declared war on North Korea, and frankly the suggestion of that is absurd,” she said.

On Saturday, Trump said that North Korea "won't be around much longer" if it continues to threaten the United States.

 

NFL stadium worker quits job after national anthem protest

After working for nearly three decades at New York’s New Era Field, a man quit his job Sunday after Buffalo Bills team members knelt in protest during the national anthem.

>> Read more trending news

“I waited until the national anthem ended,” stadium worker Erich Nikischer told WGRZ. “I took off my shirt, threw my Bills hat on the ground (and) walked out.”

Nikischer told the news station that he felt Bills players were being disrespectful with their failure to stand during the anthem, echoing statements made by President Donald Trump over the weekend in which he criticized players who have used the pre-game anthem for protest.

“That’s a total disrespect for our heritage,” Trump told a crowd gathered in Alabama on Friday. “That's a total disrespect for everything we stand for.”

Trump’s comments drew both criticism and applause.

>> Related: Trump slams players, NFL responds by taking a knee

Bills owners Terry and Kim Pegula said in a statement Saturday that the team had a meeting in the wake of Trump’s comments, which they called “divisive and disrespectful.”

“We tried to use them as an opportunity to further unify our team and our organization,” the statement said. “Our players have the freedom to express themselves in a respectful and thoughtful manner, and we all agreed that our sole messages is to provide and to promote an environment that is focused on love and equality.”

Nikischer told WGRZ that he will miss his co-workers, but added that he will not return to the stadium until after the national anthem protests end.

“I believe people have the right to protest,” Nikischer said. “I just don’t believe that’s the proper venue for it.”

Who is Anthony Weiner?

Updated Sept. 25, 2017: Anthony Weiner was sentenced Monday, to 21 months in prison for “sexting” a 15-year-old girl. 

The Chicago Tribune reported that Weiner dropped his head into his hand as he stood in court when the sentence was announced. 

Prosecutors had been seeking a 21 to 27-month sentence. 

Previous post: 

FBI sources said Friday that new emails, which “appear be pertinent” to the investigation into Hillary Clinton’s use of a private email server, were discovered during an investigation into allegations of sexting with a minor made against former Congressman Anthony Weiner.

The FBI is investigating Weiner, who is the estranged husband of Clinton’s longtime aide Huma Abedin, on charges he sent illicit texts to a 15-year-old girl in North Carolina.

It’s not the first time Weiner has been the center of a “sexting” scandal.

FBI director James B. Comey informed members of Congress on Friday via a letter that emails had surfaced in a case that “appear to be pertinent to the investigation” of Clinton's use of a private email server.

According to the New York Times, the e-mails were contained on four electronic devices seized from Weiner and Abedin, and it was those emails that led the FBI to re-open its investigation into Hillary Clinton.

So who is Anthony Weiner and what are his connections to Bill and Hillary Clinton? Here’s what we know about him.

  • Weiner was born and raised in New York City. He served the New York's 9th congressional district from January 1999 until June 2011, when he resigned after a sexting scandal was made public.
  • Weiner is married, but separated from, Hillary Clinton’s top aide, Abedin. The couple were married in July 2010 by former President Bill Clinton. Their reception was held at the Clinton’s home.
  • The couple has a 4-year-old son.
  • Weiner resigned as a New York congressman in 2011 after he sent photos of himself, clad only in underwear, to 40,000 Twitter followers, when he was trying to send the photo to a woman. That was the first of his sexting scandals.

Here is a look at all of his known sexting incidents.

May 31, 2011

Weiner accidentally posted a photo of himself clad only in his underwear to 40,000 Twitter followers instead of the 21-year-old woman he intended the photo to go to. The woman, Gennette Cordova, said she had never met Weiner. Weiner said his Twitter account was hacked and that he did not send the photo.

June 6, 2011

Days later, Weiner recanted his hacking story and admitted he sent the photo. He said he had sexted with six women over a three-year period. “I have done things I deeply regret. I apologize to my wife and our families. I’m deeply ashamed,” Weiner said.

June 11, 2011

Five days later, amid calls for him to resign, Weiner took a leave of absence from Congress to “seek professional treatment.”

June 16, 2011

Weiner announced his resignation from Congress.

July 23, 2013

Weiner again admits that he has been sexting was a woman as he is in the middle of a campaign for mayor of New York.

July 26, 2013

Some reports say Weiner’s wife, Abedin, is considering leaving him. Weiner loses the election.

May 20, 2016

The documentary “Weiner” is released. It shows the couple in some of their worst moments during the mayoral campaign, including when one of the women he sexted shows up at a campaign event.

Aug. 28, 2016

A photo of Weiner on a bed with his sleeping son by his side is published on the front of the New York Post. Weiner again is clad only in underwear. The story says he was sexting with a 15-year-old North Carolina girl at the time. According to the story, Weiner had referred to his son as a “chick magnet.”

Abedin announces the next day that she and Weiner are separating.

In the week after the latest revelation, a child-welfare agency announced its investigating Weiner after it was revealed that he sexted explicit photos of himself that also showed his 4-year-old asleep next to him.

George Clooney criticizes Hillary Clinton over failed presidential campaign

In a recent interview, George Clooney opened up about Hillary Clinton and made a few surprising remarks about the former secretary of state.

>> On Rare.us: George Clooney compares flood-drenched Houston to war-torn Syria

Clooney was a staunch Clinton supporter during the 2016 election and even donated money to her campaign, along with a slew of other Democratic operations, and held a fundraiser for her. But during the interview with The Daily Beast, the star was a bit critical of the former secretary of state. He echoed a common criticism of Clinton’s race for the Oval Office, saying that he “never really saw her elevate her game.” Clooney also said that while Clinton was qualified for the job, “being qualified for the job does not necessarily mean you’re the right person to be president.”

>> Trump administration announces new travel ban: 'The tougher, the better'

He added: "She was more qualified than even her husband was when he was elected president, but she’s not as good at communicating things. That’s simply true. When she got up and gave a speech, it didn’t soar."

>> Read the full interview here (WARNING: Profanity)

While he did take time to toss a few barbs at Clinton, Clooney was also intensely critical of President Donald Trump. Clooney remarked that growing up poor in Kentucky, he knew what it was like to struggle.

"People in Hollywood, for the most part, are people from the Midwest who moved to Hollywood to have a career," Clooney said. "So this idea of 'coastal elites' living in a bubble is ridiculous. Who lives in a bigger bubble? He lives in a gold tower and has 12 people in his company."

The 56-year-old actor and director also criticized Trump’s response to the violence in Charlottesville, Virginia.

>> Read more trending news

"Well, think about it this way: If I was president of the United States and David Duke is praising me and the white nationalists were talking about how I was on their side, the first thing I would do is I would come out and say, '[Expletive] these guys. Anyone who believes this is not in my camp, I don’t believe it, and I completely reject it,'" Clooney said.

At one point in the interview, the star laid into Trump’s former adviser Steve Bannon, saying, "Steve Bannon is a little wannabe writer who would do anything in the world to have had a script made in Hollywood.”

– The Cox Media Group National Content Desk contributed to this report.

Stevie Wonder takes 'both knees' after Trump slams NFL stars' national anthem protests

After a weekend marked by President Donald Trump’s public spats with Steph Curry, Colin Kaepernick and professional athletes who protest during the national anthem, singer Stevie Wonder knelt in support of several causes before his set at the Global Citizens Festival on Saturday in New York City.

>> Live updates: Trump slams players, NFL responds by taking a knee

>> See the clip here

>> WWII veteran, 97, kneels in support of NFL's national anthem protests

With the help of an assistant, Wonder got down on both knees and told the audience, “Tonight, I’m taking a knee for America. Not just one knee, but both knees. Both knees in prayer for our planet, our future and our leaders of the world. Amen. I wanted to say that prayer before I served you my musical meal.”

>> Read more trending news

According to CNN, Wonder also pleaded with his audience to confront hate, racism and sexism during the set, telling the crowd, “I didn’t come here to preach, but I’m telling you, our spirit must be in the right place … You need to interrupt hate, stand down bigotry, condemn sexism and find love for all of our global brothers and sisters every day.”

Trump administration announces new travel ban: 'The tougher, the better'

The Trump administration late Sunday announced it is replacing its travel ban with a new proclamation barring visitors from eight countries, saying those nations are not doing enough to block terrorists from reaching the United States. 

>> On AJC.com: Dishwasher to Doctor: Syrian refugee achieves American dream. Now he helps others do the same.

The new directive continues existing restrictions against Iran, Libya, Somalia, Syria and Yemen. And it adds new ones for Chad, North Korea and Venezuela starting Oct. 18 and remaining in place indefinitely until the countries toughen their security procedures. Venezuela’s restrictions narrowly apply to that nation’s government officials – and their immediate relatives – who are responsible for traveler screening procedures.

>> On AJC.com: From March: Trump travel ban again targets refugees 

“The travel ban: The tougher, the better,” President Donald Trump told reporters in Washington on Sunday. 

The first version of Trump’s travel ban — announced in January — sowed widespread confusion, triggered angry demonstrations in Atlanta and across the nation and ultimately stalled amid constitutional challenges. Trump replaced it in March with an order barring visitors from six Muslim-majority countries: Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen. 

>> On MyAJC.com: From June: U.S. Supreme Court reinstates key parts of Trump’s travel ban

It also halted this nation’s refugee resettlement program. Senior administration officials said Sunday they would announce plans for next fiscal year’s refugee resettlements in the coming days.

Like his original travel ban, Trump’s March 6 order drew court challenges. Trump has cast his travel restrictions as efforts to block terrorist attacks, while his critics say they are driven by discrimination. The U.S. Supreme Court is scheduled to hear arguments about it on Oct. 10. 

>> On MyAJC.com: From June: Travel ban begins as guidelines draw fire

Walt Wallace — a traveler from Richmond, Virginia, who was traveling through Atlanta’s Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport on Sunday — said he understood the security issues involved in the travel ban. But he also said he was concerned about the impact on "people who are legitimately trying to come here... escaping persecution."

>> Read more trending news

Edward Ahmed Mitchell, executive director of Georgia chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations, said Friday his organization might send attorneys to the airport. Mitchell added his organization will be watching to see if the restrictions are "motivated by legitimate concerns about national security, or are they motivated by anti-Muslim bigotry." 

"If the order only impacts people who do not already have visas to travel here, then nobody should be caught up at the airport," Mitchell said. But "if the order affects those already in transit like the first order did, then chaos could erupt and we'd need our attorneys at the airport."

Trump: McCain ‘never had any intention’ of backing latest health care bill

President Donald Trump took a shot at U.S. Sen. John McCain early Saturday in a series of tweets, saying the Arizona Republican “never had any intention” of voting for the latest GOP health care bill. McCain’s rejection of the Graham-Cassidy proposal effectively ends the party's chances at repealing Obamacare -- for now.

>> Read more trending news

McCain “let Arizona down.,” the president wrote on Twitter.

“I cannot in good conscience vote for the Graham-Cassidy proposal,” McCain said in a statement Friday.

>> Trump touts transparency on Twitter

Since the entire Democratic caucus opposes the bill, Republican leaders can afford to lose only two GOP senators on it. McCain’s decision means the bill doesn’t appear to have the votes to pass. Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., has said he opposes the bill, and Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, has said she’s “leaning against it.” Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, who voted against the last repeal bill, is also uncertain about backing the bill.

Trump was campaigning for fellow Republican Luther Strange in Huntsville, Alabama, Friday night. The president was backing Strange in a the state’s GOP primary runoff, and he covered a variety of subjects, including the health care bill and McCain’s opposition to it.

>> Trump: NFL anthem protesters should be fired

Trump said that McCain’s last senatorial campaign “was all about repeal and replace, repeal and replace.

“So he decided to do something different, and that’s fine,” Trump said. 

Trump was less conciliatory Saturday morning, saying that McCain “was sold a bill of goods” by Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y.

Trump touts transparency on Twitter

President Donald Trump has no intention of scaling back his Twitter presence. 

>> Read more trending news

The president, campaigning for fellow Republican Luther Strange in Alabama on Friday night, touted his provocative and sometimes controversial tweets, CNN reported.

"That is the great thing about Twitter," Trump said during the rally, set just days ahead of the state’s Senate Republican primary runoff election. “You know, when the press is dishonest, which is most of the time, and when they say, like, I don't want to build a wall, I can tweet ‘That was a false story. Boom. Boom. Boom.’”

Trump took more shots at the media while discussing his plans to build a wall on the country’s southern border.

"Well, every once in awhile you hear, ‘Well, he doesn't really want to build the wall,’ I say, ‘Excuse me?’” Trump said.

Trump's Twitter handle, @realDonaldTrump, now has almost 39 million followers. His tweets range from calling out the media to announcing White House policies to criticizing foreign leaders, CNN reported.

"Every time he tweets, I am entertained. Sometimes I'm informed. It tells me what to care about today, tells me what he's thinking," Scott Adams, creator of the Dilbert comic strip and an early Trump supporter, told CNN. “It's transparent. Sometimes it's provocative. Sometimes it's too provocative. I like that, too.”

Round 3: Jimmy Kimmel continues criticism of GOP’s health-care bill

For the third straight night, Jimmy Kimmel used his opening monologue to criticize the Graham-Cassidy health-care bill in the Senate. 

>> Read more trending news

Thursday night on “Jimmy Kimmel Live,” the talk show host did not back down, responding to Republicans who keep bringing him up as the GOP tries to repeal the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare.

Kimmel began with President Donald Trump getting involved on Twitter on Wednesday night. Kimmel said the president probably didn’t know that the bill proposed by Sens. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) and Bill Cassidy (R-La.) does not protect people with pre-existing conditions. But Trump would “sign copies of the Koran at the Barnes and Noble in Fallujah if it meant he could get rid of Obamacare,” he said.

Cassidy had appeared on Kimmel’s show shortly after the host revealed that his infant son had undergone open heart surgery, the Huffington Post reported. Kimmel said Wednesday that on that emotional night, “I learned there are kids with no insurance in the same situation.”

Cassidy had pledged that no family would be denied medical care because they couldn’t afford it. “This guy, Bill Cassidy, just lied to my face,” Kimmel said Tuesday night.

Cassidy responded by saying he was “sorry” Kimmel didn’t understand the legislation, and Kimmel answered several hours later. Cassidy had referenced Kimmel on CNN, asking if principles he believed were necessary to pass a repeal and replacement of Obamacare.

"I ask, does it pass the Jimmy Kimmel test?" Cassidy said. 

Thursday on “Fox & Friends,” Cassidy repeated his claim that Kimmel does not understand the bill, the Huffington Post reported.

“Yeah, so Jimmy doesn’t understand,” Cassidy said. “And not because he’s a talk show host, [but] because we’ve never spoken. He’s only heard from those on the left who are doing their best to preserve Obamacare. He’s not heard from me.”

Kimmel fired back Thursday night. 

“A lot of people have been saying that I’m not qualified to talk about this, and that is true,” he said during Thursday’s monologue. “But I think those people forget, Bill Cassidy named this test after me.”

Kimmel added he’d been told he should give Cassidy the benefit of the doubt.

“I do give him the benefit of the doubt,” Kimmel said. “I doubt all the benefits he claims are part of this new health-care bill.”

Immigrant taken by ICE from Texas courthouse was killed in Mexico

Juan Coronilla-Guerrero’s wife warned a federal judge this spring that her husband would be killed if the U.S. government followed through with his deportation.

Her prediction came true last week. Three months after the former Austin, Texas, resident was taken back to Central Mexico by federal authorities, his body was found on the side of a road in San Luis de la Paz, Guanajuato, near where he had been living with his wife’s family.

>> Read more trending news

Coronilla-Guerrero’s death comes six months after federal immigration agents took the rare step of entering the Travis County criminal courthouse to detain him on charges of illegal reentry — a move that escalated fears about ICE’s crackdown on unauthorized immigrants.

“I knew,” said Coronilla-Guerrero’s wife, who has returned to Mexico and spoke to the American-Statesman on the condition of anonymity because she fears for her family’s safety. “I knew that if he came back here, they were going to kill him, and look, that’s what happened. That’s what happened.”

She suspects the 28-year-old was killed by the same gangs that had prompted the family’s move to Austin in the first place.

Since the Trump administration ramped up deportations of people living in the U.S. illegally, immigration activists, attorneys and the relatives of deported immigrants have warned of the heavy collateral damage to families and of safety risks in Mexico related to drug trafficking and gangs.

“There’s a real reason people want to come here. I don’t think it’s going to change,” said Austin attorney Daniel Betts, a lawyer who defended Coronilla-Guerrero in criminal court.

Armed intruders

In the middle of the night on Sept. 12, Coronilla-Guerrero’s wife says four armed men barged into a house owned by her family in San Luis de la Paz. She had stayed behind in Austin with one of their children and was not at the home on the night of his death.

The intruders pointed a gun at her mother while they scoured the house, until they found Coronilla-Guerrero asleep in bed with their son, his wife said. They ripped the father from the bed and held a pistol to his head, she said.

Coronilla-Guerrero told his son, “‘Don’t worry, my love. Don’t worry,’” his wife said.

The next morning, Coronilla-Guerrero’s body was found, some 40 minutes away from their home.

Local Mexican police declined to release information about the case. Coronilla-Guerrero’s wife said police have not told her anything. A spokesman with the Mexican Consulate in Austin said he had no details.

An autopsy report obtained by the Statesman confirms basic information, saying Coronilla-Guerrero was killed by gunshot wounds in a homicide.

Local media reports said six other people were killed in the area around the time of Coronilla-Guerrero’s death.

Deportees are targeted

Coronilla-Guerrero was taken into federal custody on March 3, as he waited for a routine court appearance on misdemeanor charges of family violence and marijuana possession.

News of the arrest stoked fear that ICE would use the courts as a hunting ground for people they suspected of living in the country illegally. However, ICE has made no other known arrests there since that day.

Coronilla-Guerrero had been deported before, in 2008, but eventually made his way back to the U.S. and was working for a construction company in Buda when he was arrested for the misdemeanors.

Asked about his family violence charge, the wife said it was a misunderstanding and that he never hit her. He was granted a bond and later was sentenced to time served after pleading no contest. He had been arrested once before, when he was 18, for unlawful use of a motor vehicle and evading arrest. He was sentenced to 180 days in jail.

Early this year, Coronilla-Guerrero was one of the jail inmates who Travis County Sheriff Sally Hernandez had refused to hold for federal immigration officials because of her controversial policy not to honor so-called detention requests for most inmates suspected of being in the country illegally. The Travis County sheriff’s office honors such requests only for those charged with the most serious crimes – among them, murder, human trafficking and child sex abuse.

“Juan was a very nice young man who always had a smile on his face,” said local attorney David Peterson, who represented Coronilla-Guerrero in federal court on the illegal entry charge. “This is a true tragedy for him and his family. Deportation should never be a death sentence.”

Immigration experts said gangs often prey on deported immigrants, kidnapping them at dangerous border crossing points in Tamaulipas and Coahuila and holding them while their loved ones come up with ransom payments.

Mexican officials have encouraged the U.S. government to take immigrants to safer interior locations, such as Mexico City.

“It really is an act of violence at this point to continue the immigration policies that the government is currently pushing that are sending so many people back to their deaths,” said Bethany Carson, an immigration researcher and organizer for nonprofit Grassroots Leadership.

Leaving Austin

Coronilla-Guerrero’s wife said they had chosen Austin because of its Mexican population and because they believed they would face less racism. But in recent years, the political climate changed and state laws like Senate Bill 4, the so-called sanctuary city ban, were passed, she said.

“Even though it was illegally, we brought our kids to give them a better future,” she said, but in the end, “it wasn’t possible.”

Coronilla-Guerrero’s wife, who did not have legal authorization to live in the U.S., said she traveled to Mexico for the funeral and has no plans to return to Austin. Without papers and without a second income, it would be too difficult, she said.

Coronilla-Guerrero’s wife described her husband as a good father who worked hard to support his children. Even after his return to Mexico, she said he called often to tell his family he loved them. A friend said Coronilla-Guerrero often gave her diapers and milk for her children when her husband was out of town for work.

“Yes, he made mistakes in the past, but he had a family,” Coronilla-Guerrero’s wife said. “It wasn’t fair because he had changed. Because all people change, and he had changed for the better.”

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