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New 'tan in a bottle’ drug could prevent skin cancer, study says

A new kind of “tan in a bottle” could give you the sun-kissed skin you want while lowering your risk of skin cancer, the most commonly diagnosed cancer in the United States.

» RELATED: Study finds 73 percent of sunscreens don’t even work — how to find one that does 

That’s according to new research published Tuesday in the journal Cell Reports, by a team of scientists from Massachusetts General Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.

The drug, which is in liquid form, mimics the effect of sunlight on the skin without the sun’s harmful UV rays, tricking the skin into producing a brownish pigmentation of melanin.

>> Read more trending news

So far, according to the study, it has been tested on mixed-gender adult mice and skin samples considered surgical waste.

» RELATED: Here are the 19 best sunscreens for kids, according to experts 

The drug bronzes the skin and because it’s all done without UV rays, it could potentially slow the appearance of skin aging.

But the researchers aren’t trying to create the next consumer beauty product.

“Our real goal is a novel strategy for protecting skin from UV radiation and cancer,” David Fisher, one of the researchers, told BBC News.

» RELATED: The 14 most dangerous sunscreens for kids, according to experts 

“Dark pigment is associated with a lower risk of all forms of skin cancer -- that would be really huge.”

Fisher sees the development and inclusion of this drug as as an ingredient as something that could enhance sunscreen protection and protect against skin cancer.

“There is unequivocal evidence that sunscreens are protective against several types of skin cancer,” he told Time Magazine. “But there is also unequivocal evidence that they are not enough. Just look at the data -- skin is the most common site of cancer in people despite the embarrassing fact that UV radiation is broadly recognized as a cause in all common forms of skin cancer.”

» RELATED: 9 tips for improving your summer tan

According to the Atlanta-based Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, while many other cancer rates have declined, skin cancer rates continue to rise.

Nearly 5 million people are treated for skin cancer in the U.S. every year at an estimated cost of $8.1 billion.

In addition, melanoma causes more deaths than any other type of skin cancer -- more than 9,000 deaths each year.

» RELATED: Mom warns other parents after baby burned by sunscreen 

But the scientists said more research needs to be done to confirm the drug works in people and not just in samples of human skin cells in petri dishes.

Click here to read the full study report.

5 tips to keep you from getting sick on vacation

It’s easy to get sick when you’re traveling, because your immune system is exposed to new environments and germs it isn’t used to fighting. Plus, if you tend to eat less healthy food on vacation, your body might be missing some key nutrients it needs to stay in tip-top shape.

>> Read more trending news

Use these tips to keep yourself healthy:

Use hand sanitizer

You may want to use hand sanitizer after any outing in a public space, which, let’s be honest, is pretty much constant when traveling. After riding public transportation or in a cab, be sure to clean your hands with sanitizer. You don’t know who touched the handrails, doors or ticket machines before you.

>> Related: 10 ways to save money on gasoline during your summer travels

Carry sanitizing cloths

If you’re traveling by bus, airplane or train, be sure to wipe down your tray table and arm rests, as these places often harbor cold germs. In fact, airplane tray tables were recently found to be the most germ-filled surface on an airplane. Carry sanitizing cloths for wiping down surfaces as well as hand sanitizer.

>> Related: These 5 travel apps will help you find the best restaurants, WiFi and bathrooms in any city

Stay hydrated

Drinking water is especially important when flying. The combination of cabin pressure and dry, recirculated air in planes can rob your skin of moisture and lead to dehydration. Water will keep you naturally hydrated and feeling great for when you arrive at your final destination.

>> Related: These 5 tips will leave your skin glowing even after a long flight

Exercise, exercise, exercise

Not everyone wants to exercise on vacation, but dietitians recommend getting as much exercise as possible to keep you feeling great. Walking tours and bicycle rentals are great ways to not only learn about your destination, but to also burn calories in the process.

>> Related: 10 road trip tips for every traveler

Fight motion sickness

If you’re prone to bouts of motion sickness, your doctor may be willing to write you a prescription for promethazine, an anti-nausea medication used by NASA to fight space sickness and recommended by Dr. Joanne Feldman of UCLA’s Department of Emergency Medicine. Feldman is considered an expert in motion-sickness treatments.

9 healthy-sounding foods that have more sugar than a Krispy Kreme doughnut

American Heart Association experts recommend men shouldn’t eat more than 36 grams of added sugar a day and women should limit their sugar consumption to 25 grams.

>> Read more trending stories  

So a single Krispy Kreme doughnut, which has 10 grams of sugar, takes up a good bulk of your recommended daily intake.

>> Shaquille O'Neal buys Krispy Kreme store

But healthy-sounding snack replacements like yogurt and raisins actually rack up more sugar than you might think. And several options even have more than double the sugar of a Krispy Kreme original glazed doughnut.

>> Related: National Doughnut Day 2017 deals and freebies 

Here are 11 foods and drinks with more sugar than a Krispy Kreme doughnut:

To learn more about added sugars and your recommended intake, visit heart.org.

Is it better to wash your hands in cold or hot water? 

Do you always wash your hands in hot water? A new study suggests you can turn the heat down a notch because cleaning your hands in cold water is just as good. 

>> Read more trending news

Professors from Rutgers University-New Brunswick conducted an experiment to learn the most effective way to clean your hands. While many people assume warmer temperatures get rid of more germs, the researchers’ results proved that it’s a myth. 

Analysts gathered 20 volunteers, asking them to wash their hands, which were covered in bugs, 20 times each in 59-, 79- and 100-degree Fahrenheit water with varying amounts of soap.

»Related: How well are you cleaning the 10 filthiest places in your kitchen? 

They determined that there was no difference in the number of insects removed in each of the water temperatures or amounts of soap. 

»Related: Photos: The 10 germiest items in your home 

"People need to feel comfortable when they are washing their hands but as far as effectiveness [goes], this study shows us that the temperature of the water used did not matter," researcher Donald Schaffner said.

Although the scientists noted their study was small and more research was needed, they recommend people wash their hands for at least 20 seconds, using an adequate amount of soap to cover the entire surface. 

U.S. Alzheimer’s disease deaths up 55 percent, CDC says

An estimated 5.4 million Americans are affected by Alzheimer’s disease, making it the sixth leading cause of death in the U.S.

» RELATED: Alzheimer’s disease fueled by gut bacteria, new study finds 

According to a recent report from the Atlanta-based Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the death rate from the disease has risen by 55 percent in recent decades.

Experts collected data from death certificates and found that 93,541 Americans who died in 2014 had Alzheimer’s disease cited as the cause of death. That’s a rate of 25.4 deaths per 100,000 people.

>> Read more trending news

It’s a 54.5 percent increase since 1999, when the rate of Alzheimer’s disease deaths was 16.5 deaths per 100,000 people, according to the CDC.

» RELATED: How does Alzheimer's disease kill you? 

By 2050, experts estimate the number will jump to 13.8 million afflicted U.S. adults ages 65 and up.

The increase is due to multiple factors, including the growing population of older adults and increased reporting and diagnosis by physicians and medical examiners among others, according to the report.

While most U.S. Alzheimer’s disease deaths occurred in a nursing home or a long-term care facility, that number has dramatically declined since 1999, from 14.7 percent to 6.6 percent in 2014.

» RELATED: Living with Alzheimer’s disease and the fight to combat it 

Instead, more and more patients died at home instead of in medical facilities.About a quarter of Alzheimer’s patients in 2014 spent their last days at home compared to just 13.9 percent in 1999.

“Millions of Americans and their family members are profoundly affected by Alzheimer's disease,” CDC acting director Anne Schuchat said in a statement. “As the number of older Americans with Alzheimer's disease rises, more family members are taking on the emotionally and physically challenging role of caregiver than ever before.”

» RELATED: How to help Alzheimer’s patients enjoy life, not just ‘fade away’ 

In addition, patients, caregivers and publicly funded long-term care facilities bear significant financial and societal costs due to increasing rates of Alzheimer’s deaths.

Experts recommend more federal funding toward caregiver support and education and toward research to find a cure.

According to the CDC report, the U.S. is estimated to spend a total $259 billion in 2017 on care costs for those with Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia.

» RELATED: Don’t go it alone when caring for a spouse with dementia 

And those caring for Alzheimer’s or dementia patients provided 18.2 billion hours of unpaid assistance in 2015.

“This is a tidal wave of Alzheimer's disease that is now upon us. We've been saying Baby Boomers are getting older and we have to be ready. Now it's here. It's here, and it's not going away unless we do something serious about it. Ultimately, we want to eradicate this disease. That is possible,” Keith Fargo, director of scientific programs at the Alzheimer’s Association, told CBS News.

Click here to read the full CDC Morbidity and Mortality report.

Tobacco use kills 7 million a year, poisons environment, WHO says

The World Health Organization is highlighting the dangers of tobacco use as one of the biggest public health threats in the world.

More than 7 million people die every year due to tobacco use, costing households and governments more than $1.4 trillion in health care costs and productivity loss, experts wrote in a news release Tuesday, the day before World No Tobacco Day.

In addition, tobacco waste contains more than 7,000 toxic chemicals that poison the environment and contributes to 16 percent of all noncommunicable disease deaths, the WHO said.

>> Read more trending news

The drug is a threat to livelihoods, too, according to the WHO. Around 860 million adult smokers live in either low- or middle-income countries, often spending more than 10 percent of their income on tobacco products and leaving less for things such as food, health care and education.

According to the Atlanta-based Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), smoking is the leading cause of preventable death in the U.S. with more than 480,000 reported deaths (nearly one in five deaths) each year and 16 million Americans suffering with at least one disease caused by smoking.

This costs the country nearly $170 billion in direct medical costs.

Nationwide, according to 2015 data, 31.4 percent of U.S. high school youth reported using a tobacco product, and 10.8 percent reported smoking cigarettes.

The CDC offers tips for smokers who want to quit, including a hotline for referrals to local resources (1-800-784-8669), best practices guidelines and more at CDC.gov.

More about the threat of tobacco use at WHO.int.

WATCH: Young girl left temporarily paralyzed illustrates dangers of tick bites

A 3-year-old girl in Oregon awoke on May 13 to find herself unable to stand or use her arms.

>> Read more trending news 

Evelyn Lewis’ mother, Amanda Lewis, filmed her daughter’s failed attempts to stand with help from her husband. 

WGHP reported that the parents took Evelyn to the emergency room, where a doctor discovered a small but dangerous reason for her condition.

After combing through Evelyn’s hair, the doctor discovered a tick, diagnosing her with a condition called “tick paralysis.”

“The doctor talked to us for a minute and said over the past 15 years he had seen about seven or eight children her age with identical symptoms and more than likely she had a tick,” Amanda Lewis wrote on Facebook. “It can affect dogs also and can be fatal. I’m glad we took her in when we did and that it wasn’t something worse and that we found it before it got worse.”

According to the American Lyme Disease Foundation, tick paralysis attacks a person’s muscles and results in symptoms like muscle pains and numbness of the legs. These begin after a tick has attached itself to a host, generally on the scalp.

>> Related: Rare tick-borne illness worries some medical professionals

Fortunately, Evelyn is now doing much better, as her mother wrote on Facebook that she “is now pretty much completely back to her feisty little self. She complains a lot about her head itching but otherwise, she’s just fine.”

Here’s how much fruit juice children should drink, according to new guidelines

Next time you're grocery shopping for your kids, think twice before adding a carton of fruit juice to your basket. The American Academy of Pediatrics has updated its guidelines on all juices, advising parents to pull back on how much they serve their little ones.

» Related: What Atlanta dietitians feed their kids 

Previous recommendations said parents should wait to give their babies juice until after six months, but its latest update is suggesting that they wait one year. 

In fact, infants should only be fed breast milk or infant formula for the first six months. After six months, moms and dads can then introduce fruit to their diet, but not fruit juice. 

>> Read more trending news

“Parents may perceive fruit juice as healthy, but it is not a good substitute for fresh fruit and just packs in more sugar and calories,” said Melvin B. Heyman, MD, FAAP, co-author of the statement. “Small amounts in moderation are fine for older kids, but are absolutely unnecessary for children under 1.”

» Related: Should we slap a tax on sugary drinks? 

Scientists laid out instructions for older children, too. Toddlers who are ages 1 to 4 should only have one cup of fruit a day. Four ounces of that can come from 100 percent fruit juice, but it should be pasteurized and not labeled “drink,” “beverage” or cocktail.” 

For children ages 4 to 6, fruit juice intake shouldn't exceed four to six ounces a day. 

The amount increases just slightly for children ages 7 to 18. They can have up to two and a half cups of fruit servings, but only eight ounces of it should be juice. 

Mom who lost son to opioid overdose shares heartbreaking photo

A Calgary mother wants the world to see the destructiveness of drugs.

As her son lay dying in a hospital bed from an overdose of fentanyl, a man-made opioid, Sherri Kent climbed into the bed to comfort him and held his hand. Kent posted a photo of the emotional moment on Facebook in hopes of warning others to stay away from the deadly drug.

>> See the Facebook post here

Her son, Michael, was just 22 years old. 

“I just want everyone to know that my son Michael overdosed on fentanyl,” she wrote in the Facebook post. "My son was not an addict he made a mistake that cost him his life. I just want to make everyone aware of the epidemic that’s goin (sic) on right now. It’s out of control and there is no way to protect our children from this other than to warn them of the dangers of drug use today.

>> Read more trending news

“I’ve lost my son to this horrible tragedy and want to make parents aware that it can happen to anyone … Please share this with your family and friends to help prevent another tragedy.”

In an interview with the CBC, Kent said her son met a man who offered him heroin while he was in the town of Kelowna – about 240 miles east of Vancouver. He didn’t initially take the man’s offer; however, Kent said the man tracked her son down the next day.

She said the man and her son went into a store bathroom to use the drug.

“The other man got all sketched out and messed up and left my son in the washroom,” Kent told the CBC. “About 20 minutes later, he was too scared to go back and check on my son … so he ran for the people who own the store to unlock the door, and that’s when they found him.

“He was already blue in the lips. By the time the ambulance got there, he was in cardiac arrest.”

The young man was rushed to the hospital and placed on life support. He died on March 21 when the life-support apparatus was turned off.

>> Watch the news report here

Running Short On Time, Covered California And Insurers Seek Obamacare Answers From GOP

With a deadline looming, California’s health exchange and a major insurer pressed Republican leaders in Washington to clear up confusion over their commitment to key provisions of the Affordable Care Act.

Health insurers participating in the Covered California exchange for individuals and families must submit initial rates for 2018 on Monday. Peter Lee, the exchange’s executive director, warned in a conference call Thursday that rates could jump by more than 40 percent if the Trump administration and Republican-led Congress walk away from crucial elements of the health law.

In the meantime, House Republicans are looking to revive their Obamacare replacement bill and rally more support among moderate lawmakers in hopes of holding a vote soon.

In addition to Covered California, the chief executive of Molina Healthcare, a Long Beach-based insurer, implored Congress and the Trump administration on Thursday to act quickly to stabilize the exchange markets.

At issue are the continued federal funding of subsidies that reduce low-income consumers’ deductibles and copays and the enforcement of the individual mandate to purchase health coverage or pay a penalty.

Premiums in Covered California plans could increase by 42 percent, on average, if those subsidies aren’t funded and the mandate isn’t enforced, according to an analysis released Thursday by the exchange. Covered California has about 1.3 million customers.

Lee said it is imperative for leaders in Washington to clear up the uncertainty to avoid damaging insurance markets nationwide and hurting consumers. He said statements this week by the Trump administration that it would continue funding the cost-sharing subsidies haven’t specifically addressed whether that applies to all of 2017 or 2018.

“Health plans need to know now what are the rules of the road,” Lee said. “Insurers are considering their participation in the face of unprecedented uncertainty.”

Much of the debate this week in Washington has centered on House Republicans amending their Obamacare replacement bill, the American Health Care Act. But Lee said addressing the current market rules should be a priority ahead of crafting broader legislation.

Lee declined to comment on the latest legislative proposal from House Republicans, but he noted it still faces a long road ahead in Congress before it would win approval. “Health plans need to submit bids for today’s reality. Policymakers need to address that reality,” Lee said.

In a letter to House Speaker Paul Ryan and other congressional leaders, Molina Healthcare CEO J. Mario Molina said the cost-sharing reduction subsidies are essential for making coverage affordable for many consumers. Those subsidies cover out-of-pocket costs for exchange customers with incomes below 250 percent of the federal poverty level. They are separate from the tax credits that subsidize premium costs.

Without that federal funding, Molina wrote, “we will have no choice but to send a notice of default informing the government that we are dropping our contracts for their failure to pay premiums and seek to withdraw from the marketplace immediately.”

Molina said his company currently serves more than 1 million people through insurance exchanges in California and several other states. Molina had nearly 69,000 enrollees in Covered California as of December, state data show.

Anthem, California’s largest for-profit health insurer and a key player on exchanges nationally, issued a similar warning this week. During an earnings conference call on Wednesday, Anthem CEO Joseph Swedish said the insurer may exit some state exchanges or resubmit for higher rates if the fate of the cost-sharing subsidies isn’t resolved by early June.

Anthem has more than 310,000 customers in the California exchange, or nearly 25 percent of the market. Rival Blue Shield of California is the leader in state enrollment with 389,480, or 31 percent market share.

Republican leaders in Congress say they will address these concerns and move quickly to aid consumers by replacing the ACA with a plan that will reduce premiums and expand options for coverage.

The health law “is collapsing,” Ryan said at a news conference Thursday. “The American health care system in the individual market is in peril right now. We have a moral obligation to prevent people from getting hurt, to stop the damage from being continued.”

Many conservative Republicans oppose the Trump administration’s decision to continue to pay the cost-sharing subsidies, calling the subsidies unconstitutional because they lack congressional approval. House Republicans successfully sued to block the payments, but a judge put the ruling on hold while the Obama administration appealed the case. It’s not yet clear how President Donald Trump will handle that appeal.

Amid this political uncertainty, California Insurance Commissioner Dave Jones told insurers this week they could submit two sets of rate filings on Monday for their exchange business. One filing would reflect continued funding of cost-sharing subsidies and enforcement of the individual mandate. A separate filing could assume the opposite.

“In light of all the actions taken by the Trump administration and House leadership to undermine the ACA, I expect that health insurers will consider filing significant rate increases for 2018,” Jones wrote in a bulletin to insurers this week.

For 2017, rates in Covered California rose by 13.2 percent, on average, statewide. The state exchange is one of the few that actively negotiates rates with insurers. Premiums for the next year usually are announced in July.

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