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Republican 'Fox & Friends' guest breaks down over Trump's Charlottesville response

President Donald Trump is known to be an avid viewer of “Fox & Friends,” but on Wednesday morning, the show wasn’t entirely kind to him. Republican strategist Gianno Caldwell, who heads up Caldwell Strategic Consulting in Washington, D.C., broke down when talking about Trump’s response to the deadly Charlottesville violence.

>> Watch the clip here

Host Abby Huntsman first asked Johns Hopkins professor Wendy Osefo for her stance; Huntsman introduced the topic as the removal of Confederate monuments. However, Osefo quickly addressed the racism she saw in Charlottesville, saying, “This is not ‘talking points’ here; this is personal. And we as a nation, as a country, have to do better.”

>> Trump again blames ‘both sides’ for violence in Charlottesville

Huntsman moved to Caldwell, saying, “There are good people on both sides of this debate. We talk about keeping these statues up, people that I’ve talked to have said this is about history. How do we move forward — how do we learn from those mistakes if we just tear everything down?” But Caldwell, clearly emotional, opened by saying, “Last night I couldn’t sleep at all. Because President Trump — our president — has literally betrayed the conscience of our country.”

>> Woman who allegedly helped topple North Carolina Confederate statue arrested

Caldwell then hit back directly at Huntsman’s remarks, saying, “It’s very unfortunate that our president would say things like he did in that press conference yesterday when he says, ‘There’s good people on the side of the Nazis. They weren’t all Nazis. They weren’t all white supremacists.”He continued:

"Mr. President, good people don’t pal around with Nazis and white supremacists. Maybe they don’t consider themselves white supremacists and Nazis, but certainly they hold those views. This has become very troubling, and for anyone to come on any network and defend what President Trump did and said at that press conference yesterday is completely lost, and the potential to be morally bankrupt. I am sorry, no I believe that, and I’m being very honest as someone who has been talking about these issues for a very long time. I’m sorry that this is where we are right now."

>> Read more trending news

Huntsman tried to return to her talking point of the Confederate statues, saying, “It’s a slippery slope. Where does that end? Where do you fall specifically on that debate?” Caldwell said, “People who are taking down the statues should do so legally. … You can’t destroy property. That’s against the law.”

“Fox & Friends” is generally friendly to Trump, and his Twitter feed often directly references the show — if he sees something he likes on “Fox & Friends,” he quickly tweets it out to his 36 million followers. The New York Times noted that “for no other reason than its No. 1 fan, ['Fox & Friends'] is the most powerful TV show in America.”

ICC orders Mali extremist to pay $3.2 million in reparations

The International Criminal court ruled Thursday that a Muslim radical found guilty of destroying World Heritage cultural sites in the Malian city of Timbuktu must pay 2.7 million euros ($3.2 million) in reparations.

The court in the Netherlands found that Ahmad Al Faqi Al Mahdi had intentionally directed attacks against nine mausoleums and a mosque door in 2012, and ordered him to pay for damage to the buildings, economic losses and moral harm to victims — primarily the people of Timbuktu, who depend on tourism.

At previous hearings, Al Mahdi pleaded guilty and expressed remorse for his role in leading the destruction, urged Muslims around the world not to commit similar acts and was sentenced to nine years in prison.

Al Mahdi led pickax-wielding rebels who wrecked the simple mud-brick mausoleums covering the saints' tombs in June and July 2012 in the famed African city. The sites that were attacked — all but one of them on the World Heritage list — were built during the 15th and 16th centuries at a time when Timbuktu was considered a great center of Islamic learning.

Prosecutors said Al Mahdi was a member of Ansar Dine, an Islamic extremist group with links to al-Qaida that held power in northern Mali at the time. The militants were driven out after nearly a year by French forces, and those troops arrested Al Mahdi in neighboring Niger in 2014.

The court also ordered Al Mahdi to pay the symbolic sum of one euro ($1.17) to Mali and one euro to the international community via UNESCO, which is responsible for World Heritage site cultural listings.

While it acknowledged that he is poor, the court called the reparations "reasonable" and said the burden of paying would not make it impossible for him to reintegrate into society. It encouraged a trust fund set up for victims to help pay the damages.

The ICC said the destruction of cultural monuments like those in Timbuktu "carries a message of terror and helplessness. (It) destroys part of humanity's shared memory and collective consciousness, and renders humanity unable to transmit its values and knowledge to future generations."

___

This story corrects that Al-Mahdi was sentenced to nine years in prison previously, not Thursday.

Anna Faris gives fan relationship advice after Chris Pratt split: 'Know your worth'

Anna Faris’ breakup from Chris Pratt has given her some insight into relationships.

According to People, this week, Faris shared relationship advice on her podcast, “Unqualified.”

>> Chris Pratt, Anna Faris announce separation

“Life is too short to be in relationships where you feel this isn’t fully right or somebody doesn’t have your back, or somebody doesn’t fully value you,” she said to the caller. “Don’t be afraid to feel your independence if things aren’t right.”

Faris hinted at her own marriage and admitted her wrongdoings.

“I made that mistake, I think, a little bit, like ‘I’m checking my relationship off the list’ and if that would be the final piece of advice I could give you, that would be know your worth, know your independence,” she said.

>> On Rare.us: Natalie Cole’s sisters share their grief after the sudden death of nephew Robert Yancy

Following the announcement of her separation, Faris thanked fans for their support.

“Hey, dear listeners,” she said in the beginning of the podcast. “I just want to thank you all so much for all the love I’ve been receiving, and I truly love you.”

>> Read more trending news

Faris and Pratt announced their separation in a joint statement on their respective social media accounts after eight years of marriage. They both asked for privacy and said their No. 1 priority was their son, Jack.

(H/T People)

Bonnie Tyler to sing 'Total Eclipse of the Heart' on cruise during solar eclipse

It's the epic matchup you've been waiting for, bright eyes: Bonnie Tyler's "Total Eclipse of the Heart" and a real-life total solar eclipse.

>> Solar eclipse 2017: What time does it start; how long does it last; glasses; how to view it

>> Amazon issues refunds for potentially fake solar eclipse glasses

According to Time, Tyler, backed by DNCE, will perform the iconic 1983 song aboard Royal Caribbean's Total Eclipse Cruise during Monday's Great American Eclipse. The cruise aboard the Oasis of the Seas leaves Orlando, Florida, on Sunday and will head to the Caribbean.

>> Watch the music video here

>> Read more trending news

"Bonnie Tyler was a natural choice for this once-in-a-lifetime moment," Royal Caribbean President and CEO Michael Bayley said, Time reported.

Read more here.

Families of 22 killed in explosion outside Ariana Grande concert to receive $324,000

Each of the families of the 22 victims killed in the Manchester, England, explosion after an Ariana Grande concert will receive £250,000, or about $324,000, from theWe Love Manchester Emergency Fund, Billboard reported  Wednesday.

The organization announced the news Tuesday.

>> Read more trending news

CNN reported the announcement was made in a press release.

“The payments will ensure the families benefit from the phenomenal outpouring of public support following the attack,” the fund said in the press release.

The attack occurred May 24 outside the Manchester Arena when Salman Abedi detonated a suicide bomb. 

“The city and the world responded with such extreme kindness, generosity and solidarity in the aftermath of the Manchester Arena attack,” said Councillor Sue Murphy, chair of the trustees of the fund. “Thanks to this, we have raised more than £18 million ($23 million) and we were conscious that we had to get some of swiftly this to those with immediate needs.”

The Guardian reported that of the £18.9 million raised for survivors, less than 15 percent has been distributed to the victims.

Murphy told the outlet she and the fund are frustrated with the government since it has not yet agreed to cover the cost of distributing the funds.

“We believe that the members of the public who generously donated to the We Love Manchester appeal want to see their money to directly to the victims,” she said.

Grande contributed to the funds raised when she headlined the One Love Manchester benefit concert in the English city June 4.

Murphy said a separate fund will be set up to pay for a memorial to the explosion victims.

Arnold Schwarzenegger donates $100,000 to ‘anti-hate organization’ after Charlottesville violence

Arnold Schwarzenegger is putting his money where his mouth is after seeing coverage of the violence at a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, Saturday.

In a statement posted on a note on his Facebook page Sunday, the former governor of California said he had been “horrified by the images of Nazis and white supremacists marching in Charlottesville and I was heartbroken that a domestic terrorist took an innocent life. My thoughts and prayers are with the families of Heather Heyer, Lt. Cullen, and Trooper-Pilot Bates.” He announced he would be donating $100,000 to an “anti-hate organization.”

>> Read more trending news

Heather Heyer was killed after police said James Alex Fields Jr. drove into a crowd of counterprotesters at the rally.

Lt. H. Jay Cullen and Trooper-Pilot Burke M.M. Bates were killed in a helicopter crash Saturday while assisting with the incident in Charlottesville. The crash, which is under investigations, happened in a wooded area near a home. The two were the only fatalities.

“While these so-called ‘white nationalists’ are lucky to live in a country that defends their right to voice their awful, incorrect, hateful opinions, the rest of us must use our voices and resources to condemn hate and teach tolerance at every opportunity,” Schwarzenegger’s statement said.

“My message to them is simple: you will not win. Our voices are louder and stronger. There is no white America - there is only the United States of America. You were not born with these hateful views - you can change, grow, and evolve, and I suggest you start immediately.”

Schwarzenegger then said he would donate $100,000 to the Simon Wiesenthal Center, a Los Angeles non profit organzation 

“I’m sending $100,000 to an anti-hate organization I've worked with for decades - the Simon Wiesenthal Center, named after the great Nazi hunter who I was lucky to call a friend.”

According to its website, the Simon Wiesenthal Center “confronts anti-Semitism, hate and terrorism, promotes human rights and dignity, stands with Israel, defends the safety of Jews worldwide, and teaches the lessons of the Holocaust for future generations.”

In a statement Monday, the Wiesenthal Center called on President Donald Trump to “specifically condemn the extreme alt-right and white nationalists who sow seeds of hate, distrust and violence. They and all other extremists, left or right, have no place in the mainstream of our nation.”

That same day, Trump denounced white supremacists, Nazis and KKK members in a prepared statement. It was two days after the violence in Charlottesville. 

On Wednesday, he backtracked, returning to his initial statement Saturday in which he said “many sides” were to blame for the violence. 

“I think there's blame on both sides. And I have no doubt about it,” he said at a news conference Wednesday

That initial response drew criticism from Democrats and Republicans.

MoviePass app lets subscribers go to the movies once a day for $10 a month

Remember the days when going to the movies cost less than $10? Maybe you remember when it was less than $5.

These days, a trip to the theater can cost a pretty penny. While the national average is $8.65, in many cities, like Los Angeles and New York, a ticket can cost up to or more than $15.

But thanks to one app, $10 can now go a lot further at the cinema. 

>> Read more trending news

MoviePass, run by Netflix co-founder Mitch Lowe, is offering subscribers a deal in which they can see one movie per day for $9.95 per month.

According to KSDK: “MoviePass completes their one ticket per day services through the use of a credit card they send you. You pay the $10 a month through their app, then you select the exact movie you're going to see, and the company adds that ticket amount onto the credit card for you to use. You use this credit card at the theater to pay for your ticket. There's no gimmicks or fancy scanning you have to do, just using the credit card they send you.”

MoviePass only works at theaters that accept debit cards as payment.

And although subscribers receive tickets at a significant discount, MoviePass pays theaters the full price of each ticket used subscribers, Bloomberg reported.

Still, major movie theater chain AMC threatened the company Wednesday, calling MoviePass as “a small fringe player” and claiming its $10 plan “is not in the best interest of moviegoers, movie theatres and movie studios,” Variety reported.

“While AMC is not opposed to subscription programs generally, the one envisioned by MoviePass is not one AMC can embrace,” the company said in a statement read. “We are actively working now to determine whether it may be feasible to opt out and not participate in this shaky and unsustainable program.”

“This is so much like Blockbuster was when we rolled out Netflix or Redbox,” said Lowe, according to Variety. “It’s the big guy being afraid of the little guy offering better value to consumers.”

MoviePass, founded in 2011, originally offered the service to subscribers for about $30 a month. The company’s aim was to profit from subscribers who paid the monthly fee but didn’t use the service often enough to take advantage of the deal. 

As of Wednesday afternoon, MoviePass’s official website would not load and the company wrote on social media that it was experiencing technical difficulties as a result of overanticipated demand.  

Read more at Bloomberg and Variety.

Prince Strives to 'Letitgo' as Label Battle Rages: 365 Prince Songs in a Year

Changing his name to an intentionally unpronounceable symbol wasn't enough to free Prince from his record contract. So he threw his own funeral.

Continue reading…

Bonnie Tyler to Sing 'Total Eclipse of the Heart' on Total Eclipse Cruise

In a blast from the past, the '80s singer will perform her hit on a cruise ship as they sail under the total solar eclipse next week.

Continue reading…

Raw feelings close to the surface at Fox over Trump remarks

A Fox News Channel anchor whose reaction to President Donald Trump's comments on Charlottesville spread widely says she feels threatened but not deterred after a flood of angry responses from viewers to her words.

Kat Timpf, of the show "The Fox News Specialists," said that she's blocked part of her Twitter feed and stopped looking at emails. A day earlier, Timpf called Trump's news conference disgusting and said "I have too much eye makeup on to cry right now."

Raw feelings were close to the surface on news networks Wednesday but particularly at Fox, the favorite news network for Trump and his supporters, after the president said there was "blame on both sides" for violence at a weekend rally in Virginia organized by white nationalists. Tears flowed on the air, by CNN's Kate Bolduan as she watched a memorial service for a woman killed Saturday, by Fox's Melissa Francis as she argued on "Outnumbered" and by two guests on a "Fox & Friends segment.

Timpf's reaction to Trump was even replayed hours later by Rachel Maddow on MSNBC. That left her vulnerable to attack by Trump supporters, who seem to take particular affront when the president is criticized on Fox. Both Timpf and Eboni K. Williams, a co-host who blistered Trump in a commentary on Monday's show, inspired Twitter hashtags calling for their firing.

Wrote one critic on Twitter: "I thought I was watching MSNBC." Another suggested, "get rid of the snowflakes. Your (sic) turning into another liberal news channel." Some messages were unprintably vile; Timpf retweeted one.

Timpf, in an interview, said she was particularly chilled by one tweet that called her "a disgrace to the white race."

"I've gotten some positive things, but the negativity I've gotten is incredibly disturbing," she said. "I've seen enough to know just how disturbing the climate is right now. I'm fully aware of it and don't need any more bringing me down on a personal level."

She said that "it doesn't seem like it's too difficult to do the right thing and respond by saying 'Nazis are bad.' I can't believe that my stance is a controversial stance, or something you need to even take a stand on at all these days. It's really upsetting."

Timpf said she didn't care if she'd lost some support from Fox viewers.

"There's nothing in my head that has me even considering approaching things in any other way than I have approached it," she said.

Earlier on Wednesday, a "Fox & Friends" segment anchored by Abby Huntsman ended with both guests in tears. Billed as a debate on removing Confederate monuments between Johns Hopkins University professor Wendy Osefo and Republican consultant Gianno Caldwell, the participants instead turned their attention to condemning Trump.

"This has become very troubling," said Caldwell, who said he couldn't sleep the night before. "For anyone to come on any network and defend what President Trump did and said at the press conference yesterday is completely lost and (has) the potential to be morally bankrupt."

Fox News anchor Shepard Smith said his show had tried without success Wednesday to book Republicans who would defend Trump.

"Let's be honest, Republicans often don't really mind coming on Fox News Channel," Smith said. But he said that Republican leaders who had condemned the president spoke in generalities while not using Trump's name.

Francis lost her composure on Fox's midday show while discussing with Juan Williams the idea of whether Trump was assigning equivalency to both sides of the Charlottesville protest.

"I feel like there is nothing any of us can say right now without being judged," she said.

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