Now Playing
97X
Last Song Played
Your New Alternative
On Air
No Program
Now Playing
97X
Last Song Played
Your New Alternative

entertainment

200 items
Results 1 - 10 of 200 next >

LeBron James leads Cavaliers in rickrolling of fans during '80s night

The Cleveland Cavaliers had some fun with fans Friday night, which was designated '80s night at Quicken Loans Arena.As the standard team introduction played, it was interrupted by a music video of the team singing along to the Rick Astley hit, "Never Gonna Give You Up." The phenomenon is known as rickrolling. 

>> Read more trending stories

LeBron James was joined by J.R. Smith, Kevin Love and other teammates, who sported oversized coats, Jheri curls and other 1980s fashion statements.At the end of the video, a message read, "You've been Cavs Roll'd."

The Latest: Trump won't formally switch sides at game

The Latest developments on Donald Trump's transition to the presidency (all times local):

11:20 a.m.

President-elect Donald Trump will spend the first half of Saturday's Army-Navy game in the box of David Urban, a West Point graduate and Republican adviser and the second half in the box of retired Marine Lt. Col. Oliver North, a graduate of Annapolis.

A Trump transition official says Trump will not formally switch sides at halftime in the traditional symbol of commander-in-chief neutrality because he is not the sitting president. The team member spoke on condition of anonymity to describe the president-elect's plans.

Trump is expected to join several advisers, including incoming White House chief of staff Reince Priebus and senior adviser Steve Bannon.

Trump is a 1964 graduate of the New York Military Academy near West Point.

___

10:40 a.m.

President-elect Donald Trump has deleted and reissued a tweet after receiving criticism on social media for bad spelling.

Trump put out a fresh tweet accusing CNN of reporting "ridiculous" fake news, arguing he won't let his television show conflict with his presidency. Hours earlier, he had misspelled the word as "rediculous."

"Reports by @CNN that I will be working on The Apprentice during my Presidency, even part time, are ridiculous & untrue — FAKE NEWS!" he wrote in the corrected tweet.

The latest tweet drew some commentary about the president-elect, who has flubbed words on previous occasions on Twitter.

"Are they still rediculous, too as per the original tweet?" tweeted @JoelNihlean in response.

___

6:45 a.m.

Donald Trump is tweeting about television again — this time accusing CNN of reporting "rediculous" fake news and asserting that he won't let his television show conflict with his presidency.

Trump's Saturday morning tweets follow an announcement by Mark Burnett, the creator of "The Apprentice," that the president-elect remains an executive producer on the show.

Trump's spokeswoman, Kellyanne Conway, said on CNN Friday that Trump's ties to his reality show are being reviewed for potential conflicts of interest.

At 6:28 a.m., the president-elect tweeted that he has "NOTHING to do with The Apprentice except for fact that I conceived it with Mark B & have a big stake in it. Will devote ZERO TIME!"

Ten minutes later, he tweeted again, saying that "reports by @CNN that I will be working on The Apprentice during my Presidency, even part time, are rediculous & untrue - FAKE NEWS!"

___

2:50 a.m.

President-elect Donald Trump is partaking in one the nation's most storied football rivalries, saluting U.S. troops at the annual Army-Navy game on Saturday as he prepares to enter the White House.

The future commander-in-chief planned to attend the 117th game between the military academies at West Point and Annapolis, which is being held on relatively neutral ground, at M&T Bank Stadium in Baltimore, Md.

The appearance caps a week of rolling out Cabinet picks, holding "thank you" rallies in North Carolina, Iowa and Michigan, and trying to cement his incoming Senate majority with Saturday's runoff election in Louisiana.

Schwarzenegger: OK Trump is still 'Apprentice' producer

Arnold Schwarzenegger, star of the new version of "Celebrity Apprentice," is unfazed that President-elect Donald Trump has retained a producer's stake in the show.

Schwarzenegger said Friday that it's just business, comparable to his situation when he became California's governor and retained a screen credit and kept earning royalties for the "Terminator" movie.

"So, I think this is a contract that he had and I think it's great that he was part of it," Schwarzenegger said during a red-carpet event for NBC's "The New Celebrity Apprentice," which debuts Jan. 2.

Replacing Trump as boss in the reality show's boardroom meant "big shoes to fill," he added.

Cast members including Boy George, Nicole "Snooki" Polizzi and Eric Dickerson compete to raise money for charity, advised by Warren Buffett, Steve Ballmer and other financial heavyweights.

On Thursday, a spokeswoman for "Apprentice" creator Mark Burnett confirmed that Trump remains an executive producer on the latest edition of the long-running "Apprentice" franchise. The eight episodes ordered by NBC from MGM, where Burnett is president of its TV and digital group, were taped last February.

Trump tweeted with a defensive tone Saturday, saying he has "NOTHING to do with The Apprentice except for fact that I conceived it with Mark B & have a big stake in it. Will devote ZERO TIME!" Flubbing his spelling, he also criticized CNN's coverage of the story, calling it "rediculous & untrue - FAKE NEWS!"

Trump's continued profit from a TV series is yet another unprecedented aspect of the election of a businessman and reality star to the presidency, with questions raised about how his holdings may intersect with his presidential decisions. The extent of his involvement with "Apprentice" is unclear, including how much he earns from it. The show last aired in 2015, and with Trump starring.

Trump spokeswoman Kellyanne Conway said Friday on CNN that his ties to the reality show are being reviewed by experts looking into the president-elect's business ties. She compared Trump's continued interest in the entertainment industry to President Barack Obama's off-hours golfing.

"Presidents have a right to do things in their spare time, in their leisure time, and nobody objects to that," she said.

Tyra Banks, an adviser on the series, said Friday she had just learned of Trump's producer status "so I'm still processing."

TV personality Carrie Keagan, one of the contestants, said the show belongs to a different boss now.

"It's a brand-new show," she said. "It's an Arnold Schwarzenegger show now. It's his brand. There was no talk of anything else when we started the show. And hopefully there will be no more talk of anything else after."

___

Television Writer Lynn Elber in Los Angeles contributed to this report.

Schwarzenegger: OK Trump is still 'Apprentice' producer

Arnold Schwarzenegger, star of the new version of "Celebrity Apprentice," is unfazed that President-elect Donald Trump has retained a producer's stake in the show.

Schwarzenegger said Friday that it's just business, comparable to his situation when he became California's governor and retained a screen credit and kept earning royalties for the "Terminator" movie.

"So, I think this is a contract that he had and I think it's great that he was part of it," Schwarzenegger said during a red-carpet event for NBC's "The New Celebrity Apprentice," which debuts Jan. 2.

Replacing Trump as boss in the reality show's boardroom meant "big shoes to fill," he added.

Cast members including Boy George, Nicole "Snooki" Polizzi and Eric Dickerson compete to raise money for charity, advised by Warren Buffett, Steve Ballmer and other financial heavyweights.

On Thursday, a spokeswoman for "Apprentice" creator Mark Burnett confirmed that Trump remains an executive producer on the latest edition of the long-running "Apprentice" franchise. The eight episodes ordered by NBC from MGM, where Burnett is president of its TV and digital group, were taped last February.

Trump tweeted with a defensive tone Saturday, saying he has "NOTHING to do with The Apprentice except for fact that I conceived it with Mark B & have a big stake in it. Will devote ZERO TIME!" Flubbing his spelling, he also criticized CNN's coverage of the story, calling it "rediculous & untrue - FAKE NEWS!"

Trump's continued profit from a TV series is yet another unprecedented aspect of the election of a businessman and reality star to the presidency, with questions raised about how his holdings may intersect with his presidential decisions. The extent of his involvement with "Apprentice" is unclear, including how much he earns from it. The show last aired in 2015, and with Trump starring.

Trump spokeswoman Kellyanne Conway said Friday on CNN that his ties to the reality show are being reviewed by experts looking into the president-elect's business ties. She compared Trump's continued interest in the entertainment industry to President Barack Obama's off-hours golfing.

"Presidents have a right to do things in their spare time, in their leisure time, and nobody objects to that," she said.

Tyra Banks, an adviser on the series, said Friday she had just learned of Trump's producer status "so I'm still processing."

TV personality Carrie Keagan, one of the contestants, said the show belongs to a different boss now.

"It's a brand-new show," she said. "It's an Arnold Schwarzenegger show now. It's his brand. There was no talk of anything else when we started the show. And hopefully there will be no more talk of anything else after."

___

Television Writer Lynn Elber in Los Angeles contributed to this report.

Climate change film 'An Inconvenient Truth' gets a sequel

Al Gore's climate change documentary, "An Inconvenient Truth," is getting a sequel.

Paramount Pictures said Friday the follow-up to the Oscar-winning original will premiere at next January's Sundance Film Festival.

In the new documentary, former Vice President Gore examines global warming's escalation and the solutions at hand, Paramount said.

In a statement, Gore called for a re-dedication to solving what he called the climate crisis and said there are reasons to be hopeful.

He met this week with President-elect Donald Trump to discuss the topic and termed the meeting productive. Several days later, Trump picked Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt, a climate-change denier, as head of the Environmental Protection Agency.

The Sundance festival said it will feature other films and events about environmental change and conservation.

Climate change film 'An Inconvenient Truth' gets a sequel

Al Gore's climate change documentary, "An Inconvenient Truth," is getting a sequel.

Paramount Pictures said Friday the follow-up to the Oscar-winning original will premiere at next January's Sundance Film Festival.

In the new documentary, former Vice President Gore examines global warming's escalation and the solutions at hand, Paramount said.

In a statement, Gore called for a re-dedication to solving what he called the climate crisis and said there are reasons to be hopeful.

He met this week with President-elect Donald Trump to discuss the topic and termed the meeting productive. Several days later, Trump picked Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt, a climate-change denier, as head of the Environmental Protection Agency.

The Sundance festival said it will feature other films and events about environmental change and conservation.

'Days of Our Lives' bad guy Joseph Mascolo dies at 87

Joseph Mascolo, who played bad guy Stefano DiMera on NBC's daytime serial "Days of Our Lives," has died. He was 87.

Mascolo, who had Alzheimer's disease for a number of years, died Wednesday, according to a statement released by NBC on behalf of his wife, Patricia Schultz-Mascolo.

Although he was best known for his role as crime boss and mogul DiMera, Mascolo was a classically trained musician and appeared on Broadway in plays including "Dinner at Eight" and "That Championship Season."

His wide-ranging TV credits included the prime-time series "Kojak," ''Hill Street Blues" and "It's Garry Shandling's Show." He began on "Days of Our Lives" in 1982 and, despite taking breaks from the show, spent a total of more than two decades with it.

Mascolo also appeared in the daytime serials "The Bold and the Beautiful," ''General Hospital" and "Santa Barbara."

A native of West Hartford, Connecticut, he began studying music as a youngster and attended the University of Miami before deciding to pursue acting.

To support himself while he studied with famed acting coach Stella Adler in New York, Mascolo played clarinet with the Metropolitan Opera, according to his family.

During his long career, he appeared on stage in London and Los Angeles and was active in regional theater, including in New York and Connecticut.

On the big screen, he had parts in films including "Sharky's Machine," ''Jaws 2" and "Yes, Giorgio" — the latter giving him the chance to sing with Luciano Pavarotti.

He is survived by his wife, son, stepdaughter, sister and five grandchildren.

Judge finalizes Khloe Kardashian's divorce from Lamar Odom

Khlomar is officially no more.

A Los Angeles judge on Friday finalized Khloe Kardashian's divorce from former NBA player Lamar Odom, more than three years after the reality TV star first sought to end their marriage.

Kardashian filed for divorce in December 2013 after the pair had been married for four years, but rescinded the filing after Odom was found unconscious at a Nevada brothel last year. She cited Odom's medical condition as one reason to withdraw the divorce.

She re-filed for divorce citing irreconcilable differences in May. They have no children together.

The couple started a company called Khlomar, the nickname bestowed on their relationship after they started dating in 2009. The company will dissolve now that the divorce is complete, court documents state.

Neither Kardashian nor Odom will receive spousal support, their judgment states. While the judge signed off on it on Friday, the pair won't be officially single until Dec. 17.

Odom last played for the Los Angeles Clippers during the 2012-13 season, averaging a career-low 4.0 points and 5.9 rebounds. He signed a contract with the New York Knicks in 2014, but was cut by the team before appearing in a game.

Kardashian's first divorce filing came days after Odom pleaded no contest to a misdemeanor drunken driving charge.

The 6-foot-10-inch power forward had his best years with the Los Angeles Lakers between 2004 and 2011. The team won NBA championships in 2010 and 2011 and Odom won the NBA's sixth man award during that second championship run.

In addition to appearing on several reality series chronicling her family, Kardashian helps operate clothing stores and other businesses with her sisters, Kim and Kourtney Kardashian.

___

Anthony McCartney can be reached at http://twitter.com/mccartneyAP

'Days of Our Lives' bad guy Joseph Mascolo dies at 87

Joseph Mascolo, who played bad guy Stefano DiMera on NBC's daytime serial "Days of Our Lives," has died. He was 87.

Mascolo, who had Alzheimer's disease for a number of years, died Wednesday, according to a statement released by NBC on behalf of his wife, Patricia Schultz-Mascolo.

Although he was best known for his role as crime boss and mogul DiMera, Mascolo was a classically trained musician and appeared on Broadway in plays including "Dinner at Eight" and "That Championship Season."

His wide-ranging TV credits included the prime-time series "Kojak," ''Hill Street Blues" and "It's Garry Shandling's Show." He began on "Days of Our Lives" in 1982 and, despite taking breaks from the show, spent a total of more than two decades with it.

Mascolo also appeared in the daytime serials "The Bold and the Beautiful," ''General Hospital" and "Santa Barbara."

A native of West Hartford, Connecticut, he began studying music as a youngster and attended the University of Miami before deciding to pursue acting.

To support himself while he studied with famed acting coach Stella Adler in New York, Mascolo played clarinet with the Metropolitan Opera, according to his family.

During his long career, he appeared on stage in London and Los Angeles and was active in regional theater, including in New York and Connecticut.

On the big screen, he had parts in films including "Sharky's Machine," ''Jaws 2" and "Yes, Giorgio" — the latter giving him the chance to sing with Luciano Pavarotti.

He is survived by his wife, son, stepdaughter, sister and five grandchildren.

Hibbing struggles with how it should honor Bob Dylan

The city of Hibbing has long struggled with how it should honor its most famous son, Bob Dylan. There is a street sign, a small exhibit in the public library, but little more.

As Dylan is awarded the Nobel Prize in literature Saturday — proclaimed Bob Dylan Day in the state — some residents think that should change.

"A prophet in his own land is not always noticed," said Mary Palcich Keyes, who is part of an effort to honor the singer-songwriter-poet. "For many years, I think people just took it for granted and it didn't seem that big of a deal. Now the Nobel Prize seems to have, it's like it shook something loose finally."

Dylan was born in Duluth in 1941, raised in the Iron Range town of Hibbing and graduated from the city's high school in 1959. Earlier this year, he became the first musician in the Nobel's 115-year history to win the prize in literature.

Dylan's relationship with Hibbing has been complicated: Many didn't understand the artistic Robert Zimmerman, and after he left, they didn't realize how famous he had become, Minnesota Public Radio News reported (http://bit.ly/2gsAXFc ).

Aaron Brown, who used to help run the now-defunct Dylan Days festival, said when Dylan left town, most people didn't think he had a great singing voice.

"Then two or three years later ... everyone's fawning over him!" he said.

Around 1990, a restaurant named Zimmy's — Dylan's nickname in high school — opened downtown and drew tourists until it closed a couple of years ago. The public library still has an exhibit in its basement.

"As a person who loves Hibbing, we need to do a better job of explaining Bob to the rest of the world," said retired teacher Craig Hattam, who gives Dylan-focused tours, including passing by Dylan's childhood home, which he hopes will someday become a museum.

Hattam and others are working on an effort called the Hibbing Dylan Project to come up with a way to publicly honor Dylan. Hattam wanted a statue at the high school, but a Dylan relative has said the family would prefer a focus on educational work.

___

Information from: Minnesota Public Radio News, http://www.mprnews.org

200 items
Results 1 - 10 of 200 next >